Doctor vs. Nurse

Doctor vs. Nurse — Is There a Difference?
ADVERTISEMENT

Difference Between Doctor and Nurse

Doctornoun

A person who is licensed to practice medicine and has trained at a school of medicine or a school of osteopathic medicine; a physician.

Nursenoun

A person trained to provide medical care for the sick or disabled, especially one who is licensed and works in a hospital or physician's office.

Doctornoun

Any of certain other healthcare professionals, such as a dentist, optometrist, chiropractor, podiatrist, or veterinarian.

Nursenoun

A person employed to take care of a young child.

Doctornoun

A practitioner of alternative medicine or folk medicine who does not have traditional medical credentials.

Nursenoun

A woman employed to suckle children other than her own; a wet nurse.

ADVERTISEMENT

Doctornoun

A person who has earned the highest academic degree, usually a PhD, awarded by a college or university in a specified discipline.

Nursenoun

One that serves as a nurturing or fostering influence or means

"Town life is the nurse of civilization" (C.L.R. James).

Doctornoun

A person awarded an honorary degree by a college or university.

Nursenoun

(Zoology) A worker ant or bee that feeds and cares for the colony's young.

Doctornoun

Abbr. Dr. Used as a title and form of address for a person holding the degree of doctor.

Nurseverb

To serve as a nurse for

nursed the patient back to health.
ADVERTISEMENT

Doctornoun

Roman Catholic Church An eminent theologian.

Nurseverb

To cause or allow to take milk from the breast or teat

a mother nursing her baby.whales nursing their young.

Doctornoun

A rig or device contrived for remedying an emergency situation or for doing a special task.

Nurseverb

To try to cure by special care or treatment

nurse a cough with various remedies.

Doctorverb

(Informal) To give medical treatment to

"[He] does more than practice medicine. He doctors people. There's a difference" (Charles Kuralt).

Nurseverb

To treat carefully, especially in order to prevent pain

He nursed his injured knee by shifting his weight to the other leg.

Doctorverb

To repair, especially in a makeshift manner; rig.

Nurseverb

To manage or guide carefully; look after with care; foster

nursed her business through the depression.

Doctorverb

To falsify or change in such a way as to make favorable to oneself

doctored the evidence.

Nurseverb

To bear privately in the mind

nursing a grudge.

Doctorverb

To add ingredients so as to improve or conceal the taste, appearance, or quality of

doctor the soup with a dash of sherry.

Nurseverb

To consume slowly, especially in order to conserve

nursed one drink all evening.

Doctorverb

To alter or modify for a specific end

doctored my standard speech for the small-town audience.

Nurseverb

To serve as a nurse.

Doctorverb

(Baseball) To deface or apply a substance to (the ball) in violation of the rules in order to throw a pitch with extraordinary movement

was ejected because he doctored the ball with a piece of sandpaper.

Nurseverb

To take milk from the breast or teat; suckle

The baby is nursing. Puppies nurse for a few weeks.

Doctorverb

To practice medicine.

Nurseverb

To feed an offspring from the breast or teat

a mother who's nursing.what to feed cows when they're nursing.

Doctornoun

A physician; a member of the medical profession; one who is trained and licensed to heal the sick or injured. The final examination and qualification may award a doctor degree in which case the post-nominal letters are D.O., DPM, M.D., DMD, DDS, in the US or MBBS in the UK.

If you still feel unwell tomorrow, see your doctor.

Nursenoun

(archaic) A wet nurse.

Doctornoun

A person who has attained a doctorate, such as a Ph.D. or Th.D. or one of many other terminal degrees conferred by a college or university.

Nursenoun

A person (usually a woman) who takes care of other people’s young.

They hired a nurse to care for their young boy.

Doctornoun

A veterinarian; a medical practitioner who treats non-human animals.

Nursenoun

A person trained to provide care for the sick.

The nurse made her rounds through the hospital ward.

Doctornoun

A nickname for a person who has special knowledge or talents to manipulate or arrange transactions.

Nursenoun

(figurative) One who, or that which, brings up, rears, causes to grow, trains, or fosters.

Eton College has been called "the chief nurse of England's statesmen".

Doctornoun

(obsolete) A teacher; one skilled in a profession or a branch of knowledge; a learned man.

Nursenoun

(horticulture) A shrub or tree that protects a young plant.

Doctornoun

(dated) Any mechanical contrivance intended to remedy a difficulty or serve some purpose in an exigency.

the doctor of a calico-printing machine, which is a knife to remove superfluous colouring matterthe doctor, or auxiliary engine, also called "donkey engine"

Nursenoun

(nautical) A lieutenant or first officer who takes command when the captain is unfit for his place.

Doctornoun

A fish, the friar skate.

Nursenoun

A larva of certain trematodes, which produces cercariae by asexual reproduction.

Doctorverb

(transitive) To act as a medical doctor to.

Her children doctored her back to health.

Nursenoun

A nurse shark.

Doctorverb

To act as a medical doctor.

Nurseverb

to breastfeed

She believes that nursing her baby will make him strong and healthy.

Doctorverb

(transitive) To make (someone) into an (academic) doctor; to confer a doctorate upon.

Nurseverb

to care for the sick

She nursed him back to health.

Doctorverb

(transitive) To physically alter (medically or surgically) a living being in order to change growth or behavior.

They doctored their apple trees by vigorous pruning, and now the dwarfed trees are easier to pick.We may legally doctor a pet to reduce its libido.

Nurseverb

to treat kindly and with extra care

She nursed the rosebush and that season it bloomed.

Doctorverb

(transitive) To genetically alter an extant species.

Mendel's discoveries showed how the evolution of a species may be doctored.

Nurseverb

to manage with care and economy

Doctorverb

(transitive) To alter or make obscure, as with the intention to deceive, especially a document.

To doctor the signature of an instrument with intent to defraud is an example of forgery.

Nurseverb

to drink slowly

Doctorverb

To take medicine.

Nurseverb

to foster, to nourish

Doctornoun

a licensed medical practitioner;

I felt so bad I went to see my doctor

Nurseverb

to hold closely to one's chest

Would you like to nurse the puppy?

Doctornoun

(Roman Catholic Church) a title conferred on 33 saints who distinguished themselves through the othodoxy of their theological teaching;

the Doctors of the Church greatly influenced Christian thought down to the late Middle Ages

Nurseverb

to strike (billiard balls) gently, so as to keep them in good position during a series of shots

Doctornoun

children take the roles of doctor or patient or nurse and pretend they are at the doctor's office;

the children explored each other's bodies by playing the game of doctor

Nursenoun

one skilled in caring for young children or the sick (usually under the supervision of a physician)

Doctornoun

a person who holds Ph.D. degree from an academic institution;

she is a doctor of philosophy in physics

Nursenoun

a woman who is the custodian of children

Doctorverb

alter and make impure, as with the intention to deceive;

Sophisticate rose water with geraniol

Nurseverb

try to cure by special care of treatment, of an illness or injury;

He nursed his cold with Chinese herbs

Doctorverb

give medical treatment to

Nurseverb

maintain (a theory, thoughts, or feelings);

bear a grudgeentertain interesting notionsharbor a resentment

Doctorverb

restore by replacing a part or putting together what is torn or broken;

She repaired her TV setRepair my shoes please

Nurseverb

serve as a nurse; care for sick or handicapped people

Nurseverb

treat carefully;

He nursed his injured back by liyng in bed several hours every afternoonHe nursed the flowers in his garden and fertilized them regularly

Nurseverb

give suck to;

The wetnurse suckled the infantYou cannot nurse your baby in public in some places