New vs. Old

New vs. Old — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between New and Old

Newadjective

Having been made or come into being only a short time ago; recent

a new law.

Oldadjective

Having lived or existed for a relatively long time; far advanced in years or life.

Newadjective

Still fresh

a new coat of paint.

Oldadjective

Relatively advanced in age

Pamela is our oldest child.

Newadjective

Never used or worn before now

a new car.a new hat.

Oldadjective

Made long ago; in existence for many years

an old book.

Newadjective

Just found, discovered, or learned

new information.

Oldadjective

Of or relating to a long life or to people who have had long lives

a ripe old age.

Newadjective

Not previously experienced or encountered; novel or unfamiliar

ideas new to her.

Oldadjective

Having or exhibiting the physical characteristics of age

a prematurely old face.

Newadjective

Different from the former or the old

the new morality.

Oldadjective

Having or exhibiting the wisdom of age; mature

a child who is old for his years.

Newadjective

Recently obtained or acquired

new political power.new money.

Oldadjective

Having lived or existed for a specified length of time

She was 12 years old.

Newadjective

Additional; further

new sources of energy.

Oldadjective

Exhibiting the effects of time or long use; worn

an old coat.

Newadjective

Recently arrived or established in a place, position, or relationship

new neighbors.a new president.

Oldadjective

Known through long acquaintance; long familiar

an old friend.

Newadjective

Changed for the better; rejuvenated

The nap has made a new person of me.

Oldadjective

Skilled or able through long experience; practiced

He is an old hand at doing home repairs.

Newadjective

Being the later or latest in a sequence

a new edition.

Oldadjective

Belonging to a remote or former period in history; ancient

old fossils.

Newadjective

Currently fashionable

a new dance.

Oldadjective

Belonging to or being of an earlier time

her old classmates.

Newadjective

New In the most recent form, period, or development.

Oldadjective

often Old Being the earlier or earliest of two or more related objects, stages, versions, or periods.

Newadjective

Inexperienced or unaccustomed

new at the job.new to the trials of parenthood.

Oldadjective

Having become slower in flow and less vigorous in action. Used of a river.

Newadjective

Of or relating to a new moon.

Oldadjective

Having become simpler in form and of lower relief. Used of a landform.

Newadverb

Freshly; recently. Often used in combination

new-mown.

Oldadjective

Used as an intensive

Come back any old time. Don't give me any ol' excuse.

Newadjective

Recently made, or created.

This is a new scratch on my car!The band just released a new album.

Oldadjective

Used to express affection or familiarity

good ol' Sam.

Newadjective

Additional; recently discovered.

We turned up some new evidence from the old files.

Oldnoun

An individual of a specified age

a five-year-old.

Newadjective

Current or later, as opposed to former.

My new car is much better than my previous one, even though it is older.We had been in our new house for five years by then.

Oldnoun

Old people considered as a group. Used with the

caring for the old.

Newadjective

Used to distinguish something established more recently, named after something or some place previously existing.

New Bond Street is an extension of Bond Street.

Oldnoun

Former times; yore

in days of old.

Newadjective

In original condition; pristine; not previously worn or used.

Are you going to buy a new car or a second-hand one?

Oldadjective

Of an object, concept, relationship, etc., having existed for a relatively long period of time.

an old abandoned building;an old friend

Newadjective

Refreshed, reinvigorated, reformed.

That shirt is dirty. Go and put on a new one.I feel like a new person after a good night's sleep.After the accident, I saw the world with new eyes.

Oldadjective

Of a living being, having lived for most of the expected years.

a wrinkled old man

Newadjective

Newborn.

My sister has a new baby, and our mother is excited to finally have a grandchild.

Oldadjective

Of a perishable item, having existed for most, or more than its shelf life.

an old loaf of bread

Newadjective

Of recent origin; having taken place recently.

I can't see you for a while; the pain is still too new.Did you see the new King Lear at the theatre?

Oldadjective

Of an item that has been used and so is not new unused.

I find that an old toothbrush is good to clean the keyboard with.

Newadjective

Strange, unfamiliar or not previously known.

The idea was new to me.I need to meet new people.

Oldadjective

Having existed or lived for the specified time.

How old are they? She’s five years old and he's seven. We also have a young teen and a two-year-old child.My great-grandfather lived to be a hundred and one years old.

Newadjective

Recently arrived or appeared.

Have you met the new guy in town?He is the new kid at school.

Oldadjective

(heading) Of an earlier time.

Newadjective

Inexperienced or unaccustomed at some task.

Don't worry that you're new at this job; you'll get better with time.I'm new at this business.

Oldadjective

Former, previous.

My new car is not as good as my old one.a school reunion for Old Etonians

Newadjective

(of a period of time) Next; about to begin or recently begun.

We expect to grow at 10% annually in the new decade.

Oldadjective

That is no longer in existence.

The footpath follows the route of an old railway line.

Newadverb

Newly (especially in composition).

new-born, new-formed, new-found, new-mown

Oldadjective

Obsolete; out-of-date.

That is the old way of doing things; now we do it this way.

Newadverb

As new; from scratch.

They are scraping the site clean to build new.

Oldadjective

Familiar.

When he got drunk and quarrelsome they just gave him the old heave-ho.

Newnoun

Things that are new.

Out with the old, in with the new.

Oldadjective

Tiresome.

Your constant pestering is getting old.

Newnoun

(Australia) A kind of light beer.

Oldadjective

Said of subdued colors, particularly reds, pinks and oranges, as if they had faded over time.

Newverb

(obsolete) To make new; to recreate; to renew.

Oldadjective

A grammatical intensifier, often used in describing something positive. (Mostly in idioms like good old, big old and little old, any old and some old.)

We're having a good old time.My next car will be a big old SUV.My wife makes the best little old apple pie in Texas.

Newadjective

not of long duration; having just (or relatively recently) come into being or been made or acquired or discovered;

a new lawnew carsa new cometa new frienda new yearthe New World

Oldadjective

(obsolete) Excessive, abundant.

Newadjective

other than the former one(s); different;

they now have a new leadersmy new car is four years old but has only 15,000 miles on itready to take a new direction

Oldnoun

(with "the") People who are old; old beings; the older generation, taken as a group.

A civilised society should always look after the old in the community.

Newadjective

having no previous example or precedent or parallel;

a time of unexampled prosperity

Oldnoun

past times (especially in the phrase `in days of old')

Newadjective

of a kind not seen before;

the computer produced a completely novel proof of a well-known theorem

Oldadjective

(used especially of persons) having lived for a relatively long time or attained a specific age; especially not young; often used as a combining form to indicate an age as specified as in `a week-old baby';

an old man's eagle mindhis mother is very olda ripe old agehow old are you?

Newadjective

lacking training or experience;

the new men were eager to fightraw recruitshe was still wet behind the ears when he shipped as a hand on a merchant vessel

Oldadjective

of long duration; not new;

old traditionold houseold wineold countryold friendshipsold money

Newadjective

of a new (often outrageous) kind or fashion

Oldadjective

of an earlier time;

his old classmates

Newadjective

(often followed by `to') unfamiliar;

new experiencesexperiences new to himerrors of someone new to the job

Oldadjective

(used for emphasis) very familiar;

good old boysame old story

Newadjective

(of crops) harvested at an early stage of development; before complete maturity;

new potatoesyoung corn

Oldadjective

lacking originality or spontaneity; no longer new;

moth-eaten theories about race

Newadjective

unaffected by use or exposure;

it looks like new

Oldadjective

just preceding something else in time or order;

the previous ownermy old house was larger

Newadjective

in use after Medieval times;

New Eqyptian was the language of the 18th to 21st dynasties

Oldadjective

of a very early stage in development;

Old English is also called Anglo SaxonOld High German is High German from the middle of the 9th to the end of the 11th century

Newadjective

used of a living language; being the current stage in its development;

Modern EnglishNew Hebrew is Israeli Hebrew

Oldadjective

old in experience;

an old offenderthe older soldiers

Newadverb

very recently;

they are newly marriednewly raised objectionsa newly arranged hairdograss new washed by the raina freshly cleaned floorwe are fresh out of tomatoes

Oldadjective

used informally especially for emphasis;

a real honest-to-god live cowboyhad us a high old timewent upriver to look at a sure-enough fish wheel