Monolith vs. Obelisk

Monolith vs. Obelisk — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between Monolith and Obelisk

Monolithnoun

A large block of stone, especially one used in architecture or sculpture.

Obelisknoun

A tall, four-sided shaft of stone, usually tapered and monolithic, that rises to a pointed pyramidal top.

Monolithnoun

Something, such as a column or monument, made from one large block of stone.

Obelisknoun

The dagger sign (†), used especially as a reference mark. Also called dagger, obelus.

Monolithnoun

An outcropping, cliff, or mountain having the appearance of a single block of stone

"On a waterway of grand pilot marks, the finest lay just ahead, Beacon Rock, a distinctive black monolith some eight hundred feet high" (William Least Heat-Moon).

Obelisknoun

A tall, square, tapered, stone monolith topped with a pyramidal point, frequently used as a monument.

Monolithnoun

Something suggestive of a large block of stone, as in immovability, massiveness, or uniformity

"Standing against a global Communism it took to be monolithic, the Pentagon wanted to be taken as a monolith" (William Carroll).

Obelisknoun

(printing) The dagger sign (†), especially when used as a reference mark.

Monolithnoun

A large single block of stone, used in architecture and sculpture.

Obelisknoun

a stone pillar having a rectangular cross section tapering towards a pyramidal top

Monolithnoun

Anything massive, uniform and unmovable.

Obelisknoun

a character used in printing to indicate a cross reference or footnote

Monolithnoun

A continuous stationary-phase cast as a homogeneous column in a single piece.

Monolithnoun

a single great stone (often in the form of a column or obelisk)