Lot vs. Plot

Lot vs. Plot — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between Lot and Plot

Lotnoun

A large extent, amount, or number

is in a lot of trouble.has lots of friends.

Plotnoun

A small piece of ground, generally used for a specific purpose

a garden plot.

Lotnoun

Used adverbially to mean "to a great degree or extent" or "frequently"

felt a lot better.ran lots faster.doesn't go out a whole lot.has seen her lots lately.

Plotnoun

A measured area of land; a lot.

Lotnoun

A number of associated people or things

placating an angry lot of tenants.kids who were a noisy lot.

Plotnoun

A ground plan, as for a building; a diagram.

Lotnoun

Miscellaneous articles sold as one unit

a lot of stamps sold at an auction.

Plotnoun

See graph1.

Lotnoun

An individual of a particular kind or type

That dog is a contented lot.

Plotnoun

The pattern or sequence of interrelated events in a work of fiction, as a novel or film.

Lotnoun

A piece of land having specific boundaries, especially one constituting a part of a city, town, or block.

Plotnoun

A secret plan to accomplish a hostile or illegal purpose; a scheme.

Lotnoun

A piece of land used for a given purpose

a parking lot.

Plotverb

To represent graphically, as on a chart

plot a ship's course.

Lotnoun

The complete grounds of a film studio.

Plotverb

To locate (points or other figures) on a graph by means of coordinates.

Lotnoun

The outdoor area of a film studio.

Plotverb

To draw (a curve) connecting points on a graph.

Lotnoun

An object used in making a determination or choice at random

casting lots to see who will go first.

Plotverb

To write or develop the plot of

"I began plotting novels at about the time I learned to read" (James Baldwin).

Lotnoun

The use of objects in making a determination or choice at random

chosen by lot.

Plotverb

To form a plot for; prearrange secretly or deviously

plot an assassination.

Lotnoun

The determination or choice so made

The lot fell on the widow's only son.

Plotverb

To form or take part in a plot; scheme

were plotting for months before the attack.

Lotnoun

One's fortune in life; one's fate

It was her lot to struggle for years in obscurity.

Plotverb

To write or develop the plot for a work of fiction

A good mystery writer must plot well.

Lotverb

To apportion by lots; allot.

Plotnoun

(authorship) The course of a story, comprising a series of incidents which are gradually unfolded, sometimes by unexpected means.

Lotverb

To divide (land) into lots.

Plotnoun

An area or land used for building on or planting on.

Lotverb

To divide (goods) into lots for sale.

Plotnoun

A graph or diagram drawn by hand or produced by a mechanical or electronic device.

Lotnoun

A large quantity or number; a great deal.

to spend a lot of money;lots of people think so

Plotnoun

A secret plan to achieve an end, the end or means usually being illegal or otherwise questionable.

The plot would have enabled them to get a majority on the board.The assassination of Lincoln was part of a larger plot.

Lotnoun

A separate portion; a number of things taken collectively.

a lot of stationery

Plotnoun

Contrivance; deep reach thought; ability to plot or intrigue.

Lotnoun

One or more items auctioned or sold as a unit, separate from other items.

Plotnoun

Participation in any stratagem or conspiracy.

Lotnoun

(informal) A number of people taken collectively.

a sorry lot; a bad lot

Plotnoun

A plan; a purpose.

Lotnoun

A distinct portion or plot of land, usually smaller than a field.

a building lot in a city

Plotverb

(transitive) To conceive (a crime, etc).

They had plotted a robbery.

Lotnoun

That which happens without human design or forethought; chance; accident; hazard; fortune; fate.

Plotverb

(transitive) To trace out (a graph or diagram).

They plotted the number of edits per day.

Lotnoun

Anything (as a die, pebble, ball, or slip of paper) used in determining a question by chance, or without human choice or will.

to cast lots;to draw lots

Plotverb

(transitive) To mark (a point on a graph, chart, etc).

Every five minutes they plotted their position.

Lotnoun

The part, or fate, that falls to one, as it were, by chance, or without his planning.

Plotverb

(intransitive) To conceive a crime, misdeed, etc.

They were plotting against the king.

Lotnoun

A prize in a lottery.

Plotnoun

a secret scheme to do something (especially something underhand or illegal);

they concocted a plot to discredit the governorI saw through his little game from the start

Lotnoun

Allotment; lottery.

Plotnoun

a small area of ground covered by specific vegetation;

a bean plota cabbage patcha briar patch

Lotnoun

All members of a set; everything.

The table was loaded with food, but by evening there was nothing but crumbs; we had eaten the lot.If I were in charge, I'd fire the lot of them.

Plotnoun

the story that is told in a novel or play or movie etc.;

the characters were well drawn but the plot was banal

Lotnoun

An old unit of weight used in many European countries from the Middle Ages, often defined as 1/30 or 1/32 of a (local) pound.

Plotnoun

a chart or map showing the movements or progress of an object

Lotverb

To allot; to sort; to apportion.

Plotverb

plan secretly, usually something illegal;

They plotted the overthrow fo the government

Lotverb

To count or reckon (on or upon).

Plotverb

make a schematic or technical drawing of that shows how things work or how they are constructed

Lotnoun

(often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extent;

a batch of lettersa deal of troublea lot of moneyhe made a mint on the stock marketit must have cost plenty

Plotverb

make a plat of;

Plat the town

Lotnoun

a parcel of land having fixed boundaries;

he bought a lot on the lake

Lotnoun

your overall circumstances or condition in life (including everything that happens to you);

whatever my fortune may bedeserved a better fatehas a happy lotthe luck of the Irisha victim of circumstancessuccess that was her portion

Lotnoun

any collection in its entirety;

she bought the whole caboodle

Lotnoun

an unofficial association of people or groups;

the smart set goes therethey were an angry lot

Lotnoun

anything (straws or pebbles etc.) taken or chosen at random;

the luck of the drawthey drew lots for it

Lotnoun

(Old Testament) nephew of Abraham; God destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah but chose to spare Lot and his family who were told to flee without looking back at the destruction

Lotverb

divide into lots, as of land, for example

Lotverb

administer or bestow, as in small portions;

administer critical remarks to everyone presentdole out some moneyshell out pocket money for the childrendeal a blow to someone