Lord vs. Sir

Lord vs. Sir — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between Lord and Sir

Lordnoun

A king.

Sirnoun

Sir Used as an honorific before the given name or the full name of baronets and knights.

Lordnoun

A territorial magnate.

Sirnoun

Used as a form of polite address for a man

Don't forget your hat, sir.

Lordnoun

The proprietor of a manor.

Sirnoun

Used as a salutation in a letter

Dear Sir or Madam.

Lordnoun

Lords The House of Lords.

Sirnoun

A man of a higher rank or position.

Lordnoun

Used as a form of address for a marquis, an earl, or a viscount.

Sirnoun

A respectful term of address to a man of higher rank or position, particularly:

Lordnoun

Used as the usual style for a baron.

Sirnoun

to a knight or other low member of the peerage.

Just be careful. He gets whingy now if you don't address him as Sir John.

Lordnoun

Used as a courtesy title for a younger son of a duke or marquis.

Sirnoun

to a superior military officer.

Sir, yes sir.

Lordnoun

Used as a title for certain high officials and dignitaries

Lord Chamberlain.the Lord Mayor of London.

Sirnoun

to a teacher.

Here's my report, sir.

Lordnoun

Used as a title for a bishop.

Sirnoun

A respectful term of address to any male, especially if his name or proper title is unknown.

Excuse me, sir, do you know the way to the art museum?

Lordnoun

God.

Sirnoun

(colloquial) Used as an intensifier after yes or no.

Sir, yes sir.

Lordnoun

(Christianity) Jesus.

Sirverb

To address (someone) using "sir".

Sir, yes, sir!
Don't you sir me, private! I work for a living!

Lordnoun

A man of renowned power or authority.

Sirnoun

term of address for a man

Lordnoun

A man who has mastery in a given field or activity.

Sirnoun

a title used before the name of knight or baronet

Lordnoun

(Archaic) The male head of a household.

Lordnoun

(Archaic) A husband.

Lordverb

To insist upon or boast about so as to act in a domineering or superior manner

"He had lorded over her his self-proclaimed spiritual and poetic superiority" (David Leavitt).

Lordverb

To act in a domineering or superior manner

an upperclassman lording over the younger students.

Lordverb

To have a prominent or dominating position

The castle lords over the valley.

Lordverb

To rule over

lorded over a vast empire.

Lordnoun

(obsolete) The master of the servants of a household; (historical) the master of a feudal manor

Lordnoun

(archaic) The male head of a household, a father or husband.

Lordnoun

(archaic) The owner of a house, piece of land, or other possession

Lordnoun

One possessing similar mastery over others; (historical) any feudal superior generally; any nobleman or aristocrat; any chief, prince, or sovereign ruler; in Scotland, a male member of the lowest rank of nobility (the equivalent rank in England is baron)

Lordnoun

(historical) A feudal tenant holding his manor directly of the king

Lordnoun

A peer of the realm, particularly a temporal one

Lordnoun

A baron or lesser nobleman, as opposed to greater ones

Lordnoun

One possessing similar mastery in figurative senses (esp. as lord of ~)

Lordnoun

The magnates of a trade or profession

Lordnoun

(astrology) The heavenly body considered to possess a dominant influence over an event, time, etc.

Lordnoun

A hunchback.

Lordnoun

Sixpence.

Lordverb

Domineer or act like a lord.

Lordverb

(transitive) To invest with the dignity, power, and privileges of a lord; to grant the title of lord.

Lordnoun

terms referring to the Judeo-Christian God

Lordnoun

a person who has general authority over others

Lordnoun

a titled peer of the realm

Lordverb

make a lord of someone