Toll vs. Troll

Toll vs. Troll — Is There a Difference?
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Difference Between Toll and Troll

Tollnoun

A fixed charge or tax for a privilege, especially for passage across a bridge or along a road.

Trollverb

To fish for by trailing a baited line from behind a slowly moving boat.

Tollnoun

A charge for a service, such as a telephone call to another country.

Trollverb

To fish in by trailing a baited line

troll the lake for bass.

Tollnoun

An amount or extent of loss or destruction, as of life, health, or property

"Poverty and inadequate health care take their toll on the quality of a community's health" (Los Angeles Times).

Trollverb

To trail (a baited line) in fishing.

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Tollnoun

The act of tolling.

Trollverb

To move around in (an area) or go to (different places) searching for something

"The players cautiously refrain from saying anything candid to the press trolling the clubhouse" (David Grann).

Tollnoun

The sound of a bell being struck.

Trollverb

To examine or search through

trolling the classifieds for a cheap car.

Tollverb

To exact as a toll.

Trollverb

To sing in succession the parts of (a round, for example).

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Tollverb

To charge a fee for using (a structure, such as a bridge).

Trollverb

To sing heartily

troll a carol.

Tollverb

To sound (a large bell) slowly at regular intervals.

Trollverb

To post inflammatory or irrelevant material on (an electronic forum) to provoke responses.

Tollverb

To announce or summon by tolling.

Trollverb

To fish by trailing a line, as from a moving boat.

Tollverb

To sound in slowly repeated single tones.

Trollverb

To stroll along or wander

"As he was extremely early, he trolled past the community center" (David Bezmozgis).

Tollnoun

Loss or damage incurred through a disaster.

The war has taken its toll on the people.

Trollverb

To move around in an area or go to different places searching for something.

Tollnoun

A fee paid for some liberty or privilege, particularly for the privilege of passing over a bridge or on a highway, or for that of vending goods in a fair, market, etc.

Trollverb

To examine or search through something

trolling through old family photos looking for a picture of my aunt.

Tollnoun

(business) A fee for using any kind of material processing service.

We can handle on a toll basis your needs for spray drying, repackaging, crushing and grinding, and dry blending.

Trollverb

(Music) To sing heartily or gaily.

Tollnoun

(US) A tollbooth.

We will be replacing some manned tolls with high-speed device readers.

Trollnoun

The act of trolling for fish.

Tollnoun

A liberty to buy and sell within the bounds of a manor.

Trollnoun

A lure, such as a spoon or spinner, that is used for trolling.

Tollnoun

A portion of grain taken by a miller as a compensation for grinding.

Trollnoun

(Music) A vocal composition in successive parts; a round.

Tollnoun

The act or sound of tolling

Trollnoun

A person who posts inflammatory or otherwise unwanted material on an electronic forum, especially anonymously.

Tollverb

(transitive) To impose a fee for the use of.

Once more it is proposed to toll the East River bridges.

Trollnoun

The material so posted.

Tollverb

(ambitransitive) To levy a toll on (someone or something).

Trollnoun

A supernatural creature of Scandinavian folklore, variously portrayed as a friendly or mischievous dwarf or as a giant, that lives in caves, in the hills, or under bridges.

Tollverb

(transitive) To take as a toll.

Trollnoun

(Derogatory) A person, especially an older gay man, considered to be unpleasant or ugly.

Tollverb

To pay a toll or tallage.

Trollnoun

(fantasy) A supernatural being of varying size, now especially a grotesque humanoid creature living in caves or hills or under bridges.

Tollverb

(ergative) To ring (a bell) slowly and repeatedly.

Martin tolled the great bell every day.Ask not for whom the bell tolls.

Trollnoun

(slang) An ugly person of either sex, especially one seeking sexual experiences.

Tollverb

(transitive) To summon by ringing a bell.

The ringer tolled the workers back from the fields for vespers.

Trollnoun

Optical ejections from the top of the electrically active core regions of thunderstorms that are red in color that seem to occur after tendrils of vigorous sprites extend downward toward the cloud tops.

Tollverb

(transitive) To announce by tolling.

The bells tolled the King’s death.

Trollnoun

An instance of trolling, especially, in fishing, the trailing of a baited line.

Tollverb

To draw; pull; tug; drag.

Trollnoun

A person who provokes others (chiefly on the Internet) for their own personal amusement or to cause disruption.

Tollverb

(transitive) To tear in pieces.

Trollnoun

The act of moving round; routine; repetition.

Tollverb

(transitive) To draw; entice; invite; allure.

Hou many virgins shal she tolle and drawe to þe Lord - "Life of Our Lady"

Trollnoun

A song whose parts are sung in succession; a catch; a round.

Tollverb

(transitive) To lure with bait (especially, fish and animals).

Trollnoun

(obsolete) A trolley.

Tollverb

To take away; to vacate; to annul.

Trollverb

(intransitive) To saunter.

Tollverb

(legal) To suspend.

The defendant’s wrongful conduct.

Trollverb

(intransitive) To trundle, to roll from side to side.

Tollnoun

a fee levied for the use of roads or bridges (used for maintenance)

Trollverb

To draw someone or something out, to entice, to lure as if with trailing bait.

Tollnoun

value measured by what must be given or done or undergone to obtain something;

the cost in human life was enormousthe price of success is hard workwhat price glory?

Trollverb

To fish using a line and bait or lures trailed behind a boat similarly to trawling; to lure fish with bait.

Tollnoun

the sound of a bell being struck;

saved by the bellshe heard the distant toll of church bells

Trollverb

(transitive) To angle for with a trolling line, or with a hook drawn along the surface of the water; hence, to allure.

Tollverb

ring slowly;

For whom the bell tolls

Trollverb

(transitive) To fish in; to try to catch fish from.

Tollverb

charge a fee for using;

Toll the bridges into New York City

Trollverb

To stroll about in order to find a sexual partner, to cruise

He spends most of his waking hours trolling on WIRE.

Trollverb

(to post inflammatory material so as) to attempt to lure others into combative argument for purposes of personal entertainment and/or gratuitous disruption, especially in an online community or discussion

Trollverb

By extension, to incite anger (including outside of an Internet context); to provoke, harass or annoy.

Trollverb

To move circularly; to roll; to turn.

Trollverb

To send about; to circulate, as a vessel in drinking.

Trollverb

To sing the parts of in succession, as of a round, a catch, and the like; also, to sing loudly, freely or in a carefree way.

Trollnoun

(Scandanavian folklore) a supernatural creature (either a dwarf or a giant) that is supposed to live in caves or in the mountains

Trollnoun

a partsong in which voices follow each other; one voice starts and others join in one after another until all are singing different parts of the song at the same time;

they enjoyed singing rounds

Trollnoun

a fisherman's lure that is used in trolling;

he used a spinner as his troll

Trollnoun

angling by drawing a baited line through the water

Trollverb

circulate, move around

Trollverb

cause to move round and round;

The child trolled her hoop

Trollverb

sing the parts of (a round) in succession

Trollverb

angle with a hook and line drawn through the water

Trollverb

sing loudly and without inhibition

Trollverb

praise or celebrate in song;

All tongues shall troll you

Trollverb

speak or recite rapidly or in a rolling voice