Stride vs. Strive

Stride vs. Strive — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between Stride and Strive

Strideverb

To walk with long steps, especially in a hasty or vigorous way.

Striveverb

To exert much effort or energy; endeavor.

Strideverb

To take a single long step, as in passing over an obstruction.

Striveverb

To struggle or fight forcefully; contend

strive against injustice.

Strideverb

To stand or sit astride; straddle.

Striveverb

To try to achieve a result; to make strenuous effort; to try earnestly and persistently.

He strove to excel.to strive for the truth

Strideverb

To walk with long steps on, along, or over

striding the stage.

Striveverb

To struggle in opposition; to be in contention or dispute; to contend; to contest.

to strive against fate

Strideverb

To step over or across

stride a brook.

Striveverb

To vie; to compete as a rival.

Strideverb

To be astride of; straddle.

Strivenoun

(obsolete) An effort; a striving.

Stridenoun

The act of striding.

Strivenoun

(obsolete) strife; contention

Stridenoun

A single long step.

Striveverb

attempt by employing effort;

we endeavor to make our customers happy

Stridenoun

The distance traveled in such a step.

Striveverb

to exert much effort or energy;

straining our ears to hear

Stridenoun

A single coordinated movement of the four legs of a horse or other animal, completed when the legs return to their initial relative position.

Stridenoun

The distance traveled in such a movement.

Stridenoun

often strides A step of progress; an advance

making great strides in their studies.

Strideverb

(intransitive) To walk with long steps.

Strideverb

To stand with the legs wide apart; to straddle.

Strideverb

To pass over at a step; to step over.

Strideverb

To straddle; to bestride.

Stridenoun

A long step in walking.

Stridenoun

The distance covered by a long step.

Stridenoun

(computing) The number of memory locations between successive elements in an array, pixels in a bitmap, etc.

Stridenoun

(music genre) A jazz piano style of the 1920s and 1930s. The left hand characteristically plays a four-beat pulse with a single bass note, octave, seventh or tenth interval on the first and third beats, and a chord on the second and fourth beats.

Stridenoun

a step in walking or running

Stridenoun

the distance covered by a step;

he stepped off ten paces from the old tree and began to dig

Stridenoun

significant progress (especially in the phrase

make stridesthey made big strides in productivity

Strideverb

walk with long steps;

He strode confidently across the hall

Strideverb

cover or traverse by taking long steps;

She strode several miles towards the woods