Stem vs. Trunk

Stem vs. Trunk — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between Stem and Trunk

Stemnoun

The main ascending part of a plant; a stalk or trunk.

Trunknoun

The main woody axis of a tree.

Stemnoun

A slender stalk supporting or connecting another plant part, such as a leaf or flower.

Trunknoun

(Architecture) The shaft of a column.

Stemnoun

A banana stalk bearing several bunches of bananas.

Trunknoun

The body of a human or other vertebrate, excluding the head and limbs.

Stemnoun

The tube of a tobacco pipe.

Trunknoun

The thorax of an insect.

Stemnoun

The slender upright support of a wineglass or goblet.

Trunknoun

A proboscis, especially the long prehensile proboscis of an elephant.

Stemnoun

The small projecting shaft with an expanded crown by which a watch is wound.

Trunknoun

A main body, apart from tributaries or appendages.

Stemnoun

The rounded rod in the center of certain locks about which the key fits and is turned.

Trunknoun

The main stem of a blood vessel or nerve apart from the branches.

Stemnoun

The shaft of a feather or hair.

Trunknoun

A trunk line.

Stemnoun

The upright stroke of a typeface or letter.

Trunknoun

A chute or conduit.

Stemnoun

(Music) The vertical line extending from the head of a note.

Trunknoun

A watertight shaft connecting two or more decks.

Stemnoun

The main line of descent of a family.

Trunknoun

The housing for the centerboard of a vessel.

Stemnoun

(Linguistics) The main part of a word to which affixes are added.

Trunknoun

A covering over the hatches of a ship.

Stemnoun

(Nautical) The curved upright beam at the fore of a vessel into which the hull timbers are scarfed to form the prow.

Trunknoun

An expansion chamber on a tanker.

Stemnoun

The tubular glass structure mounting the filament or electrodes in an incandescent bulb or vacuum tube.

Trunknoun

A cabin on a small boat.

Stemverb

To have or take origin or descent

Her success stems mostly from hard work.

Trunknoun

A covered compartment for luggage and storage, generally at the rear of an automobile.

Stemverb

To remove the stem of

stemmed the apples.

Trunknoun

A large packing case or box that clasps shut, used as luggage or for storage.

Stemverb

To provide with a stem

wine glasses that are stemmed.

Trunknoun

trunks Shorts worn for swimming or other athletics.

Stemverb

To make headway against (a tide or current, for example).

Trunknoun

Part of a body.

Stemverb

To stop or stanch (a flow)

stemmed the bleeding.

Trunknoun

The usually single, more or less upright part of a tree, between the roots and the branches: the tree trunk.

Stemverb

To restrain or stop

wanted to stem the growth of government.

Trunknoun

The torso.

Stemverb

To plug or tamp (a blast hole, for example).

Trunknoun

The conspicuously extended, mobile, nose-like organ of an animal such as a sengi, a tapir or especially an elephant. The trunks of various kinds of animals might be adapted to probing and sniffing, as in the sengis, or be partly prehensile, as in the tapir, or be a versatile prehensile organ for manipulation, feeding, drinking and fighting as in the elephant.

Stemverb

(Sports) To turn (a ski, usually the uphill ski) by moving the heel outward.

Trunknoun

(heading) A container.

Stemverb

To stem a ski or both skis, as in making a turn.

Trunknoun

A large suitcase, chest, or similar receptacle for carrying or storing personal possessions, usually with a hinged, often domed lid, and handles at each end, so that generally it takes two persons to carry a full trunk.

Stemnoun

The stock of a family; a race or generation of progenitors.

Trunknoun

A box or chest usually covered with leather, metal, or cloth, or sometimes made of leather, hide, or metal, for holding or transporting clothes or other goods.

Stemnoun

A branch of a family.

Trunknoun

The luggage storage compartment of a sedan/saloon style car; a boot

Stemnoun

An advanced or leading position; the lookout.

Trunknoun

(heading) A channel for flow of some kind.

Stemnoun

(botany) The above-ground stalk (technically axis) of a vascular plant, and certain anatomically similar, below-ground organs such as rhizomes, bulbs, tubers, and corms.

Trunknoun

A circuit between telephone switchboards or other switching equipment.

Stemnoun

A slender supporting member of an individual part of a plant such as a flower or a leaf; also, by analogy, the shaft of a feather.

the stem of an apple or a cherry

Trunknoun

A chute or conduit, or a watertight shaft connecting two or more decks.

Stemnoun

A narrow part on certain man-made objects, such as a wine glass, a tobacco pipe, a spoon.

Trunknoun

A long, large box, pipe, or conductor, made of plank or metal plates, for various uses, as for conveying air to a mine or to a furnace, water to a mill, grain to an elevator, etc.

Stemnoun

(linguistics) The main part of an uninflected word to which affixes may be added to form inflections of the word. A stem often has a more fundamental root. Systematic conjugations and declensions derive from their stems.

Trunknoun

(archaic) A long tube through which pellets of clay, peas, etc., are driven by the force of the breath. A peashooter

Stemnoun

(slang) A person's leg.

Trunknoun

(mining) A flume or sluice in which ores are separated from the slimes in which they are contained.

Stemnoun

(slang) The penis.

Trunknoun

(software engineering) In software projects under source control: the most current source tree, from which the latest unstable builds (so-called "trunk builds") are compiled.

Stemnoun

(typography) A vertical stroke of a letter.

Trunknoun

The main line or body of anything.

the trunk of a vein or of an artery, as distinct from the branches

Stemnoun

(music) A vertical stroke marking the length of a note in written music.

Trunknoun

(transport) A main line in a river, canal, railroad, or highway system.

Stemnoun

(nautical) The vertical or nearly vertical forward extension of the keel, to which the forward ends of the planks or strakes are attached.

Trunknoun

(architecture) The part of a pilaster between the base and capital, corresponding to the shaft of a column.

Stemnoun

Component on a bicycle that connects the handlebars to the bicycle fork

Trunknoun

A large pipe forming the piston rod of a steam engine, of sufficient diameter to allow one end of the connecting rod to be attached to the crank, and the other end to pass within the pipe directly to the piston, thus making the engine more compact.

Stemnoun

(anatomy) A part of an anatomic structure considered without its possible branches or ramifications.

Trunknoun

Shorts used for swimming (swim trunks).

Stemnoun

(slang) A crack pipe; or the long, hollow portion of a similar pipe (i.e. meth pipe) resembling a crack pipe.

Trunkverb

(obsolete) To lop off; to curtail; to truncate.

Stemnoun

(chiefly British) A winder on a clock, watch, or similar mechanism

Trunkverb

(mining) To extract (ores) from the slimes in which they are contained, by means of a trunk.

Stemnoun

alternative form of STEM

Trunknoun

the main stem of a tree; usually covered with bark; the bole is usually the part that is commercially useful for lumber

Stemverb

To remove the stem from.

to stem cherries; to stem tobacco leaves

Trunknoun

luggage consisting of a large strong case used when traveling or for storage

Stemverb

To be caused or derived; to originate.

The current crisis stems from the short-sighted politics of the previous government.

Trunknoun

the body excluding the head and neck and limbs;

they moved their arms and legs and bodies

Stemverb

To descend in a family line.

Trunknoun

compartment in an automobile that carries luggage or shopping or tools;

he put his golf bag in the trunk

Stemverb

To direct the stem (of a ship) against; to make headway against.

Trunknoun

a long flexible snout as of an elephant

Stemverb

(obsolete) To hit with the stem of a ship; to ram.

Stemverb

To ram (clay, etc.) into a blasting hole.

Stemverb

(transitive) To stop, hinder (for instance, a river or blood).

to stem a tide

Stemverb

(skiing) To move the feet apart and point the tips of the skis inward in order to slow down the speed or to facilitate a turn.

Stemnoun

(linguistics) the form of a word after all affixes are removed;

thematic vowels are part of the stem

Stemnoun

a slender or elongated structure that supports a plant or fungus or a plant part or plant organ

Stemnoun

cylinder forming a long narrow part of something

Stemnoun

the tube of a tobacco pipe

Stemnoun

front part of a vessel or aircraft;

he pointed the bow of the boat toward the finish line

Stemnoun

a turn made in skiing; the back of one ski is forced outward and the other ski is brought parallel to it

Stemverb

grow out of, have roots in, originate in;

The increase in the national debt stems from the last war

Stemverb

cause to point inward;

stem your skis

Stemverb

stop the flow of a liquid;

staunch the blood flowthem the tide

Stemverb

remove the stem from;

for automatic natural language processing, the words must be stemmed