Pier vs. Dock

Pier vs. Dock — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between Pier and Dock

Piernoun

A platform extending from a shore over water and supported by piles or pillars, used to secure, protect, and provide access to ships or boats.

Docknoun

A platform extending from a shore over water, used to secure, protect, and provide access to a boat or ship; a pier.

Piernoun

Such a structure used predominantly for entertainment.

Docknoun

docks An area along a commercial waterfront having docks or piers.

Piernoun

A supporting structure at the junction of connecting spans of a bridge.

Docknoun

The area of water between two piers or alongside a pier that receives a vessel for loading, unloading, or repairs

The boat moved slowly into the dock.

Piernoun

A pillar, generally rectangular in cross section, supporting an arch or roof.

Docknoun

A floating platform attached to a mooring and used as a rest or play area when swimming.

Piernoun

The portion of a wall between windows, doors, or other openings.

Docknoun

A platform or door at which trucks or trains load or unload cargo.

Piernoun

A reinforcing structure that projects from a wall; a buttress.

Docknoun

(Computers) See docking station.

Piernoun

A raised platform built from the shore out over water, supported on piles; used to secure, or provide access to shipping; a jetty.

Docknoun

The solid or fleshy part of an animal's tail.

Piernoun

A similar structure, especially at a seaside resort, used to provide entertainment.

Docknoun

The tail of an animal after it has been bobbed or clipped.

Piernoun

A structure that projects tangentially from the shoreline to accommodate ships; often double-sided.

Docknoun

A demarcated or enclosed space where the defendant stands or sits in a court of law.

Piernoun

A structure supporting the junction between two spans of a bridge.

Docknoun

See sorrel1.

Piernoun

(architecture) A rectangular pillar, or similar structure, that supports an arch, wall or roof.

Dockverb

To maneuver (a vessel or vehicle) into or next to a dock.

Piernoun

a platform built out from the shore into the water and supported by piles; provides access to ships and boats

Dockverb

To couple (two or more spacecraft, for example) in space.

Piernoun

(architecture) a vertical supporting structure (as a portion of wall between two doors or windows)

Dockverb

To move or come into or next to a dock.

Piernoun

a support for two adjacent bridge spans

Dockverb

To clip short or cut off (an animal's tail, for example).

Dockverb

To deprive of a benefit or a part of one's wages, especially as a punishment

The company docks its employees for unauthorized absences.

Dockverb

To withhold or deduct a part from (one's salary or wages).

Docknoun

Any of the genus Rumex of coarse weedy plants with small green flowers related to buckwheat, especially common dock, and used as potherbs and in folk medicine, especially in curing nettle rash.

Docknoun

A burdock plant, or the leaves of that plant.

Docknoun

The fleshy root of an animal's tail.

Docknoun

The part of the tail which remains after the tail has been docked.

Docknoun

(obsolete) The buttocks or anus.

Docknoun

A leather case to cover the clipped or cut tail of a horse.

Docknoun

A fixed structure attached to shore to which a vessel is secured when in port.

Docknoun

The body of water between two piers.

Docknoun

A structure attached to shore for loading and unloading vessels.

Docknoun

A section of a hotel or restaurant.

coffee dock

Docknoun

(electronics) A device designed as a base for holding a connected portable appliance such as a laptop computer (in this case, referred to as a docking station), or a mobile telephone, for providing the necessary electrical charge for its autonomy, or as a hardware extension for additional capabilities.

Docknoun

A toolbar that provides the user with a way of launching applications, and switching between running applications.

Docknoun

An act of docking; joining two things together.

Docknoun

Part of a courtroom where the accused sits.

Dockverb

(transitive) To cut off a section of an animal's tail, to practise a caudectomy.

Dockverb

(transitive) To reduce (wages); to deduct from.

Dockverb

(transitive) To cut off, bar, or destroy.

to dock an entail

Dockverb

(intransitive) To land at a harbour.

Dockverb

To join two moving items.

Dockverb

To drag a user interface element (such as a toolbar) to a position on screen where it snaps into place.

Docknoun

an enclosure in a court of law where the defendant sits during the trial

Docknoun

any of certain coarse weedy plants with long taproots, sometimes used as table greens or in folk medicine

Docknoun

a platform built out from the shore into the water and supported by piles; provides access to ships and boats

Docknoun

a platform where trucks or trains can be loaded or unloaded

Docknoun

landing in a harbor next to a pier where ships are loaded and unloaded or repaired; may have gates to let water in or out;

the ship arrived at the dock more than a day late

Docknoun

the solid bony part of the tail of an animal as distinguished from the hair

Docknoun

a short or shortened tail of certain animals

Dockverb

come into dock;

the ship docked

Dockverb

deprive someone of benefits, as a penalty

Dockverb

deduct from someone's wages

Dockverb

remove or shorten the tail of an animal

Dockverb

haul into a dock;

dock the ships