Motion vs. Movement

Motion vs. Movement — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between Motion and Movement

Motionnoun

The act or process of changing position or place.

Movementnoun

The act or an instance of moving; a change in place or position.

Motionnoun

A meaningful or expressive change in the position of the body or a part of the body; a gesture.

Movementnoun

A particular manner of moving.

Motionnoun

Active operation

set the plan in motion.

Movementnoun

A change in the location of troops, ships, or aircraft for tactical or strategic purposes.

Motionnoun

The ability or power to move

lost motion in his arm.

Movementnoun

A series of actions and events taking place over a period of time and working to foster a principle or policy

a movement toward world peace.

Motionnoun

The manner in which the body moves, as in walking.

Movementnoun

An organized effort by supporters of a common goal

a leader of the labor movement.

Motionnoun

A prompting from within; an impulse or inclination

resigned of her own motion.

Movementnoun

A tendency or trend

a movement toward larger kitchens.

Motionnoun

(Music) Melodic ascent and descent of pitch.

Movementnoun

A change in the market price of a security or commodity.

Motionnoun

(Law) An application made to a court for an order or a ruling.

Movementnoun

An evacuation of the bowels.

Motionnoun

A formal proposal put to the vote under parliamentary procedures.

Movementnoun

The matter so evacuated.

Motionnoun

A mechanical device or piece of machinery that moves or causes motion; a mechanism.

Movementnoun

The suggestion or illusion of motion in a painting, sculpture, or design.

Motionnoun

The movement or action of such a device.

Movementnoun

The progression of events in the development of a literary plot.

Motionverb

To direct by making a gesture

motioned us to our seats.

Movementnoun

The rhythmical or metrical structure of a poetic composition.

Motionverb

To indicate by making a gesture; signal

motioned that he was ready.

Movementnoun

(Music) A self-contained section of an extended composition.

Motionverb

To make a motion (that something should happen).

Movementnoun

(Linguistics) In generative grammar, a transformation in which a constituent in one part of a syntactic structure is copied or displaced into a different location, creating a new structure.

Motionverb

To signal by making a gesture

motioned to her to enter.

Movementnoun

A mechanism, such as the works of a watch, that produces or transmits motion.

Motionnoun

(uncountable) A state of progression from one place to another.

Movementnoun

Physical motion between points in space.

I saw a movement in that grass on the hill.

Motionnoun

(countable) A change of position with respect to time.

Movementnoun

(engineering) A system or mechanism for transmitting motion of a definite character, or for transforming motion, such as the wheelwork of a watch.

Motionnoun

(physics) A change from one place to another.

Movementnoun

The impression of motion in an artwork, painting, novel etc.

Motionnoun

(countable) A parliamentary action to propose something. A similar procedure in any official or business meeting.

The motion to amend is now open for discussion.

Movementnoun

A trend in various fields or social categories, a group of people with a common ideology who try together to achieve certain general goals

The labor movement has been struggling in America since the passage of the Taft-Hartley act in 1947.

Motionnoun

(obsolete) An entertainment or show, especially a puppet show.

Movementnoun

(music) A large division of a larger composition.

Motionnoun

(philosophy) from κίνησις (kinesis); any change. Traditionally of four types: generation and corruption, alteration, augmentation and diminution, and change of place.

Movementnoun

(aviation) An instance of an aircraft taking off or landing.

Albuquerque International Sunport serviced over 200,000 movements last year.

Motionnoun

Movement of the mind, desires, or passions; mental act, or impulse to any action; internal activity.

Movementnoun

(baseball) The deviation of a pitch from ballistic flight.

The movement on his cutter was devastating.

Motionnoun

(law) A formal request, oral or written, made to a judge or court of law to obtain an official court ruling or order for a legal action to be taken by, or on behalf of, the movant.

Movementnoun

An act of emptying the bowels.

Motionnoun

(euphemistic) A movement of the bowels; the product of such movement.

Movementnoun

(obsolete) Motion of the mind or feelings; emotion.

Motionnoun

(music) Change of pitch in successive sounds, whether in the same part or in groups of parts. (Conjunct motion is that by single degrees of the scale. Contrary motion is when parts move in opposite directions. Disjunct motion is motion by skips. Oblique motion is when one part is stationary while another moves. Similar or direct motion is when parts move in the same direction.)

Movementnoun

a change of position that does not entail a change of location;

the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprisemovement is a sign of lifean impatient move of his handgastrointestinal motility

Motionnoun

(obsolete) A puppet, or puppet show.

Movementnoun

a natural event that involves a change in the position or location of something

Motionverb

To gesture indicating a desired movement.

He motioned for me to come closer.

Movementnoun

the act of changing location from one place to another;

police controlled the motion of the crowdthe movement of people from the farms to the citieshis move put him directly in my path

Motionverb

(proscribed) To introduce a motion in parliamentary procedure.

Movementnoun

a group of people with a common ideology who try together to achieve certain general goals;

he was a charter member of the movementpoliticians have to respect a mass movementhe led the national liberation front

Motionverb

To make a proposal; to offer plans.

Movementnoun

a major self-contained part of a symphony or sonata;

the second movement is slow and melodic

Motionnoun

a natural event that involves a change in the position or location of something

Movementnoun

a series of actions advancing a principle or tending toward a particular end;

he supported populist campaignsthey worked in the cause of world peacethe team was ready for a drive toward the pennantthe movement to end slaverycontributed to the war effort

Motionnoun

the use of movements (especially of the hands) to communicate familiar or prearranged signals

Movementnoun

an optical illusion of motion produced by viewing a rapid succession of still pictures of a moving object;

the cinema relies on apparent motionthe succession of flashing lights gave an illusion of movement

Motionnoun

a change of position that does not entail a change of location;

the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprisemovement is a sign of lifean impatient move of his handgastrointestinal motility

Movementnoun

a euphemism for defecation;

he had a bowel movement

Motionnoun

a state of change;

they were in a state of steady motion

Movementnoun

a general tendency to change (as of opinion);

not openly liberal but that is the trend of the booka broad movement of the electorate to the right

Motionnoun

a formal proposal for action made to a deliberative assembly for discussion and vote;

he made a motion to adjournshe called for the question

Movementnoun

the driving and regulating parts of a mechanism (as of a watch or clock);

it was an expensive watch with a diamond movement

Motionnoun

the act of changing location from one place to another;

police controlled the motion of the crowdthe movement of people from the farms to the citieshis move put him directly in my path

Movementnoun

the act of changing the location of something;

the movement of cargo onto the vessel

Motionnoun

an optical illusion of motion produced by viewing a rapid succession of still pictures of a moving object;

the cinema relies on apparent motionthe succession of flashing lights gave an illusion of movement

Motionverb

show, express or direct through movement;

He gestured his desire to leave