Hardware vs. Software

Hardware vs. Software — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between Hardware and Software

Hardwarenoun

Metal goods and utensils such as locks, tools, and cutlery.

Softwarenoun

The programs, routines, and symbolic languages that control the functioning of the hardware and direct its operation.

Hardwarenoun

(Computers) A computer and the associated physical equipment directly involved in the performance of data-processing or communications functions.

Softwarenoun

(computing) Encoded computer instructions, usually modifiable (unless stored in some form of unalterable memory such as ROM).

Hardwarenoun

Machines and other physical equipment directly involved in performing an industrial, technological, or military function.

Softwarenoun

(military) The human beings involved in warfare, as opposed to hardware such as weapons and vehicles.

Hardwarenoun

(Informal) Weapons, especially military weapons.

Softwarenoun

(computer science) written programs or procedures or rules and associated documentation pertaining to the operation of a computer system and that are stored in read/write memory;

the market for software is expected to expand

Hardwarenoun

Fixtures, equipment, tools and devices used for general-purpose construction and repair of a structure or object. Also such equipment as sold as stock by a store of the same name, e.g. hardware store.

He needed a hammer, nails, screws, nuts, bolts and other assorted hardware, so he went to the hardware store.

Hardwarenoun

(informal) Equipment.

military hardware

Hardwarenoun

(computing) The part of a computer that is fixed and cannot be altered without replacement or physical modification; motherboard, expansion cards, etc. Compare software.

Hardwarenoun

(technology) Electronic equipment.

Hardwarenoun

Metal implements.

Hardwarenoun

(slang) A firearm.

Hardwarenoun

major items of military weaponry (as tanks or missile)

Hardwarenoun

instrumentalities (tools or implements) made of metal

Hardwarenoun

(computer science) the mechanical, magnetic, electronic, and electrical components making up a computer system