You vs. U

You vs. U — Is There a Difference?
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Difference Between You and U

Youpronoun

(object pronoun) The people spoken, or written to, as an object.

Uadjective

Chiefly British Of or appropriate to the upper class, especially in language usage.

Youpronoun

(To) yourselves, (to) yourself.

Unoun

The 21st letter of the modern English alphabet.

Youpronoun

(object pronoun) The person spoken to or written to, as an object. (Replacing thee; originally as a mark of respect.)

Unoun

Any of the speech sounds represented by the letter u.

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Youpronoun

(subject pronoun) The people spoken to or written to, as a subject. (Replacing ye.)

Both of you should get ready now.You are all supposed to do as I tell you.

Unoun

The 21st in a series.

Youpronoun

(subject pronoun) The person spoken to or written to, as a subject. (Originally as a mark of respect.)

Unoun

Something shaped like the letter U.

Youpronoun

(indefinite personal pronoun) Anyone, one; an unspecified individual or group of individuals (as subject or object).

Unoun

U A grade that indicates an unsatisfactory status.

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Youdeterminer

The individual or group spoken or written to.

Have you gentlemen come to see the lady who fell backwards off a bus?

Unoun

Used as a courtesy title before the name of a man in a Burmese-speaking area.

Youdeterminer

Used before epithets for emphasis.

You idiot!

Unoun

A thing in the shape of the letter U

Youverb

(transitive) To address (a person) using the pronoun you, rather than thou, especially historically when you was more formal.

Upronoun

you in text messaging and internet conversations

Take me with u.

Unoun

a nitrogen-containing base found in RNA (but not in DNA) and derived from pyrimidine; pairs with adenine

Unoun

a heavy toxic silvery-white radioactive metallic element; occurs in many isotopes; used for nuclear fuels and nuclear weapons

Unoun

the 21st letter of the Roman alphabet

Uadjective

(chiefly British) of or appropriate to the upper classes especially in language use