Vault vs. Catacomb

Vault vs. Catacomb — Is There a Difference?
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Difference Between Vault and Catacomb

Vaultnoun

An arched structure, usually of masonry or concrete, serving to cover a space.

Catacombnoun

often catacombs An underground cemetery consisting of chambers or tunnels with recesses for graves.

Vaultnoun

An arched overhead covering, such as the sky, that resembles the architectural structure in form.

Catacombnoun

An underground, often labyrinthine passageway.

Vaultnoun

A room or space, such as a cellar or storeroom, with an arched ceiling, especially when underground.

Catacombnoun

(often plural) An underground system of tunnels and chambers with recesses for graves, used (in former times) as a cemetery; a tunnel system used for burying the dead, as in Paris or Ancient Rome.

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Vaultnoun

A room or compartment, often built of steel, for the safekeeping of valuables

a bank vault.

Catacombnoun

an underground tunnel with recesses where bodies were buried (as in ancient Rome)

Vaultnoun

A burial chamber, especially when underground.

Vaultnoun

(Anatomy) An arched part of the body, especially the top part of the skull.

Vaultnoun

The act of vaulting; a jump.

Vaultnoun

A piece of gymnastic equipment with an upholstered body used especially for vaulting. Also called vaulting horse.

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Vaultverb

To construct or supply with an arched ceiling; cover with a vault.

Vaultverb

To build or make in the shape of a vault; arch.

Vaultverb

To jump or leap over, especially with the aid of a support such as the hands or a pole.

Vaultverb

To jump or leap, especially with the use of the hands or a pole.

Vaultverb

To accomplish something suddenly or vigorously

vaulted into a position of wealth.

Vaultnoun

An arched masonry structure supporting and forming a ceiling, whether freestanding or forming part of a larger building.

The decoration of the vault of Sainte-Chapelle was much brighter before its 19th-century restoration.

Vaultnoun

Any arched ceiling or roof.

Vaultnoun

Anything resembling such a downward-facing concave structure, particularly the sky and caves.

The stalactites held tightly to the cave's vault.

Vaultnoun

The space covered by an arched roof, particularly underground rooms and church crypts.

Vaultnoun

Any cellar or underground storeroom.

Vaultnoun

Any burial chamber, particularly those underground.

Family members had been buried in the vault for centuries.

Vaultnoun

The secure room or rooms in or below a bank used to store currency and other valuables; similar rooms in other settings.

The bank kept their money safe in a large vault.

Vaultnoun

(gymnastics) A piece of apparatus used for performing jumps.

Vaultnoun

(gymnastics) A gymnastic movement performed on this apparatus.

Vaultnoun

(computing) An encrypted digital archive.

Vaultnoun

An underground or covered conduit for water or waste; a drain; a sewer.

Vaultnoun

An underground or covered reservoir for water or waste; a cistern; a cesspit.

Vaultnoun

A room employing a cesspit or sewer: an outhouse; a lavatory.

Vaultnoun

An act of vaulting, formerly by deer; a leap or jump.

Vaultnoun

(equestrianism) nodot=a: a circular movement by the horse.

Vaultnoun

(gymnastics) An event or performance involving a vaulting horse.

Vaultverb

(transitive) To build as, or cover with a vault.

Vaultverb

(ambitransitive) To jump or leap over.

The fugitive vaulted over the fence to escape.

Vaultnoun

a burial chamber (usually underground)

Vaultnoun

a strongroom or compartment (often made of steel) for safekeeping of valuables

Vaultnoun

an arched brick or stone ceiling or roof

Vaultnoun

the act of jumping over an obstacle

Vaultverb

jump across or leap over (an obstacle)

Vaultverb

bound vigorously