Tension vs. Friction

Tension vs. Friction — Is There a Difference?
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Difference Between Tension and Friction

Tensionnoun

The act or process of stretching something tight.

Frictionnoun

The rubbing of one object or surface against another.

Tensionnoun

The condition of so being stretched; tautness.

Frictionnoun

Conflict, as between persons having dissimilar ideas or interests; clash.

Tensionnoun

A force tending to stretch or elongate something.

Frictionnoun

(Physics) A force that resists the relative motion or tendency to such motion of two bodies or substances in contact.

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Tensionnoun

A measure of such a force

a tension on the cable of 50 pounds.

Frictionnoun

The rubbing of one object or surface against another.

Tensionnoun

Mental, emotional, or nervous strain

working under great tension to make a deadline.

Frictionnoun

(physics) A force that resists the relative motion or tendency to such motion of two bodies in contact.

Tensionnoun

Barely controlled hostility or a strained relationship between people or groups

the dangerous tension between opposing military powers.

Frictionnoun

Massage of the body to restore circulation.

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Tensionnoun

A balanced relation between strongly opposing elements

"the continuing, and essential, tension between two of the three branches of government, judicial and legislative" (Haynes Johnson).

Frictionnoun

(figuratively) Conflict, as between persons having dissimilar ideas or interests; clash.

Tensionnoun

The interplay of conflicting elements in a piece of literature, especially a poem.

Frictionnoun

a state of conflict between persons

Tensionnoun

A device for regulating tautness, especially a device that controls the tautness of thread on a sewing machine or loom.

Frictionnoun

the resistance encountered when one body is moved in contact with another

Tensionnoun

(Electricity) Voltage or potential; electromotive force.

Frictionnoun

effort expended in rubbing one object against another

Tensionverb

To subject to tension; tighten.

Tensionnoun

The condition of being held in a state between two or more forces, which are acting in opposition to each other.

Tensionnoun

Psychological state of being tense.

Tensionnoun

A feeling of nervousness, excitement, or fear that is created in a movie, book, etc.; suspense.

Tensionnoun

State of an elastic object which is stretched in a way which increases its length.

Tensionnoun

Force transmitted through a rope, string, cable, or similar object (used with prepositions on, in, or of, e.g., "The tension in the cable is 1000 N", to convey that the same magnitude of force applies to objects attached to both ends).

Tensionnoun

Voltage. Usually only the terms low tension, high tension, and extra-high tension, and the abbreviations LT, HT, and EHT are used. They are not precisely defined; LT is normally a few volts, HT a few hundreds of volts, and EHT thousands of volts.

Tensionverb

To place an object in tension, to pull or place strain on.

We tensioned the cable until it snapped.

Tensionnoun

feelings of hostility that are not manifest;

he could sense her latent hostility to himthe diplomats' first concern was to reduce international tensions

Tensionnoun

(psychology) a state of mental or emotional strain or suspense;

he suffered from fatigue and emotional tensionstress is a vasoconstrictor

Tensionnoun

the physical condition of being stretched or strained;

it places great tension on the leg muscleshe could feel the tenseness of her body

Tensionnoun

a balance between and interplay of opposing elements or tendencies (especially in art or literature);

there is a tension created between narrative time and movie timethere is a tension between these approaches to understanding history

Tensionnoun

(physics) a stress that produces an elongation of an elastic physical body;

the direction of maximum tension moves asymptotically toward the direction of the shear

Tensionnoun

the action of stretching something tight;

tension holds the belt in the pulleys