Taro vs. Yam

Taro vs. Yam — Is There a Difference?
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Difference Between Taro and Yam

Taronoun

A widely cultivated tropical Asian aroid plant (Colocasia esculenta) having broad peltate leaves and large starchy edible corms.

Yamnoun

Any of numerous chiefly tropical vines of the genus Dioscorea, many of which have edible tuberous roots.

Taronoun

The corm of this plant. In both senses also called cocoyam.

Yamnoun

The starchy root of any of these plants, used in the tropics as food.

Taronoun

Colocasia esculenta, raised as a food primarily for its corm, which distantly resembles potato.

Yamnoun

See sweet potato.

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Taronoun

Any of several other species with similar corms and growth habit in Colocasia, Alocasia etc.

Yamnoun

Any climbing vine of the genus Dioscorea in the Eastern and Western hemispheres, usually cultivated.

Taronoun

Food from a taro plant.

Yamnoun

The edible, starchy, tuberous root of that plant, a tropical staple food.

Taronoun

edible starchy tuberous root of taro plants

Yamnoun

(US) A sweet potato; a tuber from the species Ipomoea batatas.

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Taronoun

herb of the Pacific islands grown throughout the tropics for its edible root and in temperate areas as an ornamental for its large glossy leaves

Yamnoun

(Scotland) Potato.

Taronoun

tropical starchy tuberous root

Yamnoun

(NZ) A oca; a tuber from the species Oxalis tuberosa.

Yamnoun

Taro.

Yamnoun

An orange-brown colour, like that of yam.

Yamnoun

edible tuber of any of several yams

Yamnoun

any of a number of tropical vines of the genus Dioscorea many having edible tuberous roots

Yamnoun

sweet potato with deep orange flesh that remains moist when baked

Yamnoun

edible tuberous root of various yam plants of the genus Dioscorea grown in the tropics world-wide for food