Sight vs. Vision

Sight vs. Vision — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between Sight and Vision

Sightnoun

The ability to see.

Visionnoun

The faculty of sight; eyesight

poor vision.

Sightnoun

Field of vision

out of my sight.

Visionnoun

Something that is or has been seen.

Sightnoun

The act or fact of seeing

hoping for a sight of land.caught sight of a rare bird.

Visionnoun

Unusual competence in discernment or perception; intelligent foresight

a leader of vision.

Sightnoun

Something seen

That bird is a rare sight around here.

Visionnoun

The manner in which one sees or conceives of something.

Sightnoun

Something worth seeing; a spectacle

the sights of London.

Visionnoun

A mental image produced by the imagination.

Sightnoun

(Informal) Something unsightly or ridiculous

looked a sight after crossing the swamp.

Visionnoun

The mystical experience of seeing something that is not in fact present to the eye or is supernatural.

Sightnoun

The foreseeable future; prospect

no solution in sight.

Visionnoun

A person or thing of extraordinary beauty.

Sightnoun

Mental perception or consideration

We lost sight of the purpose of our visit.

Visionverb

To see in a vision.

Sightnoun

often sights A device used to assist aim by guiding the eye, as on a firearm or surveying instrument.

Visionverb

To picture in the mind; envision.

Sightnoun

An aim or observation taken with such a device.

Visionnoun

(uncountable) The sense or ability of sight.

Sightverb

To perceive with the eyes; get sight of

sighted land after 40 days at sea.

Visionnoun

(countable) Something seen; an object perceived visually.

Sightverb

To observe through a sight or an optical instrument

sight a target.

Visionnoun

(countable) Something imaginary one thinks one sees.

He tried drinking from the pool of water, but realized it was only a vision.

Sightverb

To adjust the sights of (a rifle, for example).

Visionnoun

Something unreal or imaginary; a creation of fancy.

Sightverb

To take aim with (a firearm).

Visionnoun

(countable) An ideal or a goal toward which one aspires.

He worked tirelessly toward his vision of world peace.

Sightverb

To direct one's gaze; look carefully.

Visionnoun

(countable) A religious or mystical experience of a supernatural appearance.

He had a vision of the Virgin Mary.

Sightverb

To take aim

sighted along the barrel of the gun.

Visionnoun

(countable) A person or thing of extraordinary beauty.

Sightnoun

(in the singular) The ability to see.

He is losing his sight and now can barely read.

Visionnoun

(uncountable) Pre-recorded film or tape; footage.

Sightnoun

The act of seeing; perception of objects by the eye; view.

to gain sight of land

Visionverb

(transitive) To imagine something as if it were to be true.

Sightnoun

Something seen.

Visionverb

(transitive) To present as in a vision.

Sightnoun

Something worth seeing; a spectacle, either good or bad.

We went to London and saw all the sights – Buckingham Palace, Tower Bridge, and so on.You really look a sight in that ridiculous costume!

Visionverb

(transitive) To provide with a vision.

Sightnoun

A device used in aiming a projectile, through which the person aiming looks at the intended target.

Visionnoun

a vivid mental image;

he had a vision of his own death

Sightnoun

A small aperture through which objects are to be seen, and by which their direction is settled or ascertained.

the sight of a quadrant

Visionnoun

the ability to see; the faculty of vision

Sightnoun

a great deal, a lot; frequently used to intensify a comparative.

a sight of moneyThis is a darn sight better than what I'm used to at home!

Visionnoun

the perceptual experience of seeing;

the runners emerged from the trees into his clear visionhe had a visual sensation of intense light

Sightnoun

In a drawing, picture, etc., that part of the surface, as of paper or canvas, which is within the frame or the border or margin. In a frame, the open space, the opening.

Visionnoun

the formation of a mental image of something that is not perceived as real and is not present to the senses;

popular imagination created a world of demonsimagination reveals what the world could be

Sightnoun

(obsolete) The instrument of seeing; the eye.

Visionnoun

a religious or mystical experience of a supernatural appearance;

he had a vision of the Virgin Mary

Sightnoun

Mental view; opinion; judgment.

In their sight it was harmless.

Sightverb

(transitive) To register visually.

Sightverb

(transitive) To get sight of (something).

to sight land from a ship

Sightverb

(transitive) To apply sights to; to adjust the sights of; also, to give the proper elevation and direction to by means of a sight.

to sight a rifle or a cannon

Sightverb

(transitive) To take aim at.

Sightnoun

an instance of visual perception;

the sight of his wife brought him back to realitythe train was an unexpected sight

Sightnoun

anything that is seen;

he was a familiar sight on the televisionthey went to Paris to see the sights

Sightnoun

the ability to see; the faculty of vision

Sightnoun

a optical instrument for aiding the eye in aiming, as on a firearm or surveying instrument

Sightnoun

a range of mental vision;

in his sight she could do no wrong

Sightnoun

the range of vision;

out of sight of land

Sightnoun

the act of looking or seeing or observing;

he tried to get a better view of ithis survey of the battlefield was limited

Sightnoun

(often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extent;

a batch of lettersa deal of troublea lot of moneyhe made a mint on the stock marketit must have cost plenty

Sightverb

catch sight of; to perceive with the eyes;

he caught sight of the king's men coming over the ridge