Rent vs. Lodge

Rent vs. Lodge — Is There a Difference?
ADVERTISEMENT

Difference Between Rent and Lodge

Rentnoun

Payment, usually of an amount fixed by contract, made by a tenant at specified intervals in return for the right to occupy or use the property of another.

Lodgenoun

An often rustic building used as a temporary abode or shelter

a ski lodge.

Rentnoun

A similar payment made for the use of a facility, equipment, or service provided by another.

Lodgenoun

A small house on the grounds of an estate or a park, used by a caretaker or gatekeeper.

Rentnoun

The return derived from cultivated or improved land after deduction of all production costs.

Lodgenoun

An inn.

ADVERTISEMENT

Rentnoun

The difference between the price paid for use of a resource whose supply is inelastic and the minimum price at which that resource would still be provided. Also called economic rent.

Lodgenoun

Any of various Native American dwellings, such as a hogan, wigwam, or longhouse.

Rentnoun

An opening made by rending; a rip.

Lodgenoun

The group living in such a dwelling.

Rentnoun

A breach of relations between persons or groups; a rift.

Lodgenoun

A local chapter of certain fraternal organizations.

ADVERTISEMENT

Rentverb

To obtain occupancy or use of (another's property) in return for regular payments.

Lodgenoun

The meeting hall of such a chapter.

Rentverb

To grant temporary occupancy or use of (one's own property or a service) in return for regular payments

rents out TV sets.

Lodgenoun

The members of such a chapter.

Rentverb

To be for rent

The cottage rents for $1,200 a month.

Lodgenoun

The den of certain animals, such as the dome-shaped structure built by beavers.

Rentverb

A past tense and a past participle of rend.

Lodgeverb

To provide with temporary quarters, especially for sleeping

lodges travelers in the shed.

Rentnoun

A payment made by a tenant at intervals in order to occupy a property.

Lodgeverb

To rent a room to.

Rentnoun

A similar payment for the use of equipment or a service.

Lodgeverb

To place or establish in quarters

lodged the children with relatives after the fire.

Rentnoun

(economics) A profit from possession of a valuable right, as a restricted license to engage in a trade or business.

A New York city taxicab license earns more than $10,000 a year in rent.

Lodgeverb

To serve as a depository for; contain

This cellar lodges our oldest wines.

Rentnoun

An object for which rent is charged or paid.

Lodgeverb

To place, leave, or deposit, as for safety

documents lodged with a trusted associate.

Rentnoun

(obsolete) Income; revenue.

Lodgeverb

To fix, force, or implant

lodge a bullet in a wall.

Rentnoun

A tear or rip in some surface.

Lodgeverb

To register (a charge or complaint, for example) before an authority, such as a court; file.

Rentnoun

A division or schism.

Lodgeverb

To vest (authority, for example).

Rentverb

(transitive) To occupy premises in exchange for rent.

Lodgeverb

To beat (crops) down flat

rye lodged by the cyclone.

Rentverb

(transitive) To grant occupation in return for rent.

Lodgeverb

To live in a place temporarily.

Rentverb

(transitive) To obtain or have temporary possession of an object (e.g. a movie) in exchange for money.

Lodgeverb

To rent accommodations, especially for sleeping.

Rentverb

(intransitive) To be leased or let for rent.

The house rents for five hundred dollars a month.

Lodgeverb

To be or become embedded

The ball lodged in the fence.

Rentverb

simple past tense and past participle of rend

Lodgenoun

A building for recreational use such as a hunting lodge or a summer cabin.

Rentnoun

a regular payment by a tenant to a landlord for use of some property

Lodgenoun

: a building or room near the entrance of an estate or building, especially as a college mailroom.

Rentnoun

an opening made forcibly as by pulling apart;

there was a rip in his pantsshe had snags in her stockings

Lodgenoun

A local chapter of some fraternities, such as freemasons.

Rentnoun

the return derived from cultivated land in excess of that derived from the poorest land cultivated under similar conditions

Lodgenoun

(US) A local chapter of a trade union.

Rentnoun

the act of rending or ripping or splitting something;

he gave the envelope a vigorous rip

Lodgenoun

A rural hotel or resort, an inn.

Rentverb

let for money;

We rented our apartment to friends while we were abroad

Lodgenoun

A beaver's shelter constructed on a pond or lake.

Rentverb

grant use or occupation of under a term of contract;

I am leasing my country estate to some foreigners

Lodgenoun

A den or cave.

Rentverb

engage for service under a term of contract;

We took an apartment on a quiet streetLet's rent a carShall we take a guide in Rome?

Lodgenoun

The chamber of an abbot, prior, or head of a college.

Rentverb

hold under a lease or rental agreement; of goods and services

Lodgenoun

(mining) The space at the mouth of a level next to the shaft, widened to permit wagons to pass, or ore to be deposited for hoisting; called also platt.

Lodgenoun

A collection of objects lodged together.

Lodgenoun

An indigenous American home, such as tipi or wigwam. By extension, the people who live in one such home; a household.

Lodgenoun

(historic) A family of Native Americans, or the persons who usually occupy an Indian lodge; as a unit of enumeration, reckoned from four to six persons.

The tribe consists of about two hundred lodges, that is, of about a thousand individuals.

Lodgeverb

(intransitive) To be firmly fixed in a specified position.

I've got some spinach lodged between my teeth.The bullet missed its target and lodged in the bark of a tree.

Lodgeverb

(intransitive) To stay in a boarding-house, paying rent to the resident landlord or landlady.

The detective Sherlock Holmes lodged in Baker Street.

Lodgeverb

(intransitive) To stay in any place or shelter.

Lodgeverb

(transitive) To drive (an animal) to covert.

Lodgeverb

(transitive) To supply with a room or place to sleep in for a time.

Lodgeverb

(transitive) To put money, jewellery, or other valuables for safety.

Lodgeverb

(transitive) To place (a statement, etc.) with the proper authorities (such as courts, etc.).

Lodgeverb

(intransitive) To become flattened, as grass or grain, when overgrown or beaten down by the wind.

The heavy rain caused the wheat to lodge.

Lodgeverb

(transitive) To cause to flatten, as grass or grain.

Lodgenoun

English physicist who studied electromagnetic radiation and was a pioneer of radiotelegraphy (1851-1940)

Lodgenoun

a formal association of people with similar interests;

he joined a golf clubthey formed a small lunch societymen from the fraternal order will staff the soup kitchen today

Lodgenoun

small house at the entrance to the grounds of a country mansion; usually occupied by a gatekeeper or gardener

Lodgenoun

a small (rustic) house used as a temporary shelter

Lodgenoun

any of various native American dwellings

Lodgenoun

a hotel providing overnight lodging for travelers

Lodgeverb

be a lodger; stay temporarily;

Where are you lodging in Paris?

Lodgeverb

fix, force, or implant;

lodge a bullet in the table

Lodgeverb

file a formal charge against;

The suspect was charged with murdering his wife

Lodgeverb

provide housing for;

We are lodging three foreign students this semester