Quite vs. Almost

Quite vs. Almost — Is There a Difference?
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Difference Between Quite and Almost

Quiteadverb

To the greatest extent; completely

quite alone.not quite finished. See Usage Note at perfect.

Almostadverb

Slightly short of; not quite; nearly

almost time to go.was almost asleep.had almost finished. See Usage Note at none.

Quiteadverb

Actually; really

I'm quite positive about it.

Almostadverb

Very close to, but not quite.

Almost all people went there. - Not all but very close to it.We almost missed the train. - Not missed but very close to it.

Quiteadverb

To a degree; rather

quite soon.quite tasty.

Almostnoun

(informal) Something or someone that doesn't quite make it.

In all the submissions, they found four papers that were clearly worth publishing and another dozen almosts.
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Quiteadverb

(heading) To the greatest extent or degree; completely, entirely.

Almostadverb

(of actions or states) slightly short of or not quite accomplished; `near' is sometimes used informally for `nearly' and `most' is sometimes used informally for `almost';

the job is (just) about donethe baby was almost asleep when the alarm soundedwe're almost finishedthe car all but ran her downhe nearly faintedtalked for nigh onto 2 hoursthe recording is well-nigh perfectvirtually all the parties signed the contractI was near exhausted by the runmost everyone agrees

Quiteadverb

With verbs, especially past participles.

Quiteadverb

With prepositional phrases and spatial adverbs.

Quiteadverb

With predicative adjectives.

Quiteadverb

With attributive adjectives, following an (especially indefinite) article; chiefly as expressing contrast, difference etc.

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Quiteadverb

Preceding nouns introduced by the indefinite article. Chiefly in negative constructions.

Quiteadverb

With adverbs of manner.

Quiteadverb

(heading) In a fully justified sense; truly, perfectly, actually.

Quiteadverb

Coming before the indefinite article and an attributive adjective. (Now largely merged with moderative senses, below.)

Quiteadverb

With plain adjectives, past participles, and adverbs.

Quiteadverb

Coming before the definite article and an attributive superlative.

Quiteadverb

Before a noun preceded by an indefinite article; now often with ironic implications that the noun in question is particularly noteworthy or remarkable.

Quiteadverb

Before a noun preceded by the definite article.

Quiteadverb

With prepositional or adverbial phrases.

Quiteadverb

To a moderate extent or degree; somewhat, rather.

Quiteinterjection

Indicates agreement; "exactly so".

Quitenoun

(bullfighting) A series of passes made with the cape to distract the bull.

Quiteadverb

to a degree (not used with a negative);

quite tastyquite soonquite illquite rich

Quiteadverb

to the greatest extent; completely;

you're quite rightshe was quite alonewas quite mistakenquite the oppositenot quite finisheddid not quite make it

Quiteadverb

of an unusually noticeable or exceptional or remarkable kind (not used with a negative);

her victory was quite somethingshe's quite a girlquite a filmquite a walkwe've had quite an afternoon

Quiteadverb

actually or truly or to an extreme;

was quite a sudden changeit's quite the thing to doquite the rageQuite so!