Oxymoron vs. Tautology

Oxymoron vs. Tautology — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between Oxymoron and Tautology

Oxymoronnoun

A rhetorical figure in which incongruous or contradictory terms are combined, as in a deafening silence and a mournful optimist.

Tautologynoun

Needless repetition of the same sense in different words; redundancy.

Oxymoronnoun

A figure of speech in which two words or phrases with opposing meanings are used together intentionally for effect.

Tautologynoun

An instance of such repetition.

Oxymoronnoun

A contradiction in terms.

Tautologynoun

(Logic) A statement composed of simpler statements in such a way that it is logically true whether the simpler statements are factually true or false; for example, the statement Either it will rain tomorrow or it will not rain tomorrow.

Oxymoronnoun

conjoining contradictory terms (as in `deafening silence')

Tautologynoun

(uncountable) Redundant use of words, a pleonasm, an unnecessary and tedious repetition.

It is tautology to say, "Forward Planning".

Tautologynoun

(countable) An expression that features tautology.

The expression "raze to the ground" is a tautology, since the word "raze" includes the notion "to the ground".

Tautologynoun

In propositional logic: a statement that is true for all truth values of its propositional variables. In first-order logic: a statement that is true for all truth values of its Boolean atoms.

Tautologynoun

(logic) a statement that is necessarily true;

the statement `he is brave or he is not brave' is a tautology

Tautologynoun

useless repetition;

to say that something is `adequate enough' is a tautology