Meet vs. Pass

Meet vs. Pass — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between Meet and Pass

Meetverb

To come into the presence of by chance or arrangement

I was surprised to meet an old friend in the park. I met a friend for coffee.

Passverb

To move on or ahead; proceed

The train passed through fields of wheat.

Meetverb

To come into the company of

I met my colleagues for a meeting.

Passverb

To extend; run

The river passes through our land.

Meetverb

To be introduced to; make the acquaintance of

Have you met my wife?.

Passverb

To move by or in front of something

The band passed and the crowd cheered.

Meetverb

To come together or confront in opposition

The rival teams meet next week.

Passverb

To move past another vehicle

The sports car passed on the right.

Meetverb

To be present at the arrival of

met the train.

Passverb

To gain passage despite obstacles

pass through difficult years.

Meetverb

To come into conjunction with; join or touch

where the road meets the highway.

Passverb

To move past in time; elapse

The days passed quickly.

Meetverb

To come into conformity with the views, wishes, or opinions of

The firm has done its best to meet us on that point.

Passverb

To be transferred from one to another; circulate

The wine passed around the table.

Meetverb

To come to the notice of (the senses)

There is more here than meets the eye.

Passverb

(Sports) To transfer a ball or puck to a teammate.

Meetverb

To experience or undergo

He met his fate with courage. The project has met a setback.

Passverb

To be communicated or exchanged between persons

Loud words passed in the corridor.

Meetverb

To be sufficient for (a need, for example); fulfill

meet all the conditions in the contract.

Passverb

To be transferred or conveyed to another by will or deed

The title passed to the older heir.

Meetverb

To deal or contend with effectively

We can meet each problem as it arises.

Passverb

To undergo transition from one condition, form, quality, or characteristic to another

Daylight passed into darkness.

Meetverb

To pay; settle

enough money to meet expenses.

Passverb

To come to an end

My anger suddenly passed. The headache finally passed.

Meetverb

To come together

Didn't recognize him when we met. Where should we meet for lunch?.

Passverb

To cease to exist; die. Often used with on

The patient passed on during the night.

Meetverb

To come into conjunction; be joined

The two pipes meet in the corner.

Passverb

To happen; take place

wanted to know what had passed at the meeting.

Meetverb

To come together as opponents; contend

The team met with its rival.

Passverb

To be allowed to happen without notice or challenge

Let their rude remarks pass.

Meetverb

To become introduced

Where did the two of you meet?.

Passverb

Sports & Games To decline one's turn to bid, draw, bet, compete, or play.

Meetverb

To assemble

Protesters met in the square.

Passverb

To decline an offer

When we offered him dessert, he passed.

Meetverb

To occur together, especially in one person or entity

Suspense and intrigue meet in this new movie.

Passverb

To undergo an examination or a trial with favorable results.

Meetnoun

A meeting or contest, especially an athletic competition.

Passverb

To serve as a barely acceptable substitute

The spare tire was nearly bald but would pass until we bought a new one.

Meetadjective

Fitting; proper

"It seems not meet, nor wholesome to my place" (Shakespeare).

Passverb

To be accepted as a member of a group by denying one's own ancestry or background.

Meetverb

Of individuals: to make personal contact.

Passverb

To be approved or adopted

The motion to adjourn passed.

Meetverb

To come face to face with by accident; to encounter.

Fancy meeting you here!Guess who I met at the supermarket today?

Passverb

To make a decision

to pass upon a legal question.

Meetverb

To come face to face with someone by arrangement.

Let's meet at the station at 9 o'clock.Shall we meet at 8 p.m in our favorite chatroom?

Passverb

To convey property to an heir or heirs

to pass according to the terms of the will.

Meetverb

To get acquainted with someone.

I'm pleased to meet you!I'd like you to meet a colleague of mine.I met my husband through a mutual friend at a party. It wasn't love at first sight; in fact, we couldn't stand each other at first!

Passverb

(Medicine) To be discharged from a bodily part

The patient had a lot of pain when the kidney stone passed.

Meetverb

(Ireland) To French kiss someone.

Passverb

(Sports) To thrust or lunge in fencing.

Meetverb

Of groups: to gather or oppose.

Passverb

To go by without stopping; proceed beyond or leave behind

The bus passed a gas station.

Meetverb

To gather for a formal or social discussion.

I met with them several times.The government ministers met today to start the negotiations.

Passverb

To go across; go through

We passed the border into Mexico.

Meetverb

To come together in conflict.

Passverb

To allow to go by or elapse; spend

He passed his winter in Vermont.

Meetverb

(sports) To play a match.

England and Holland will meet in the final.

Passverb

To go by without paying attention to; disregard or ignore

If you pass the new photographs in the collection, you'll miss some outstanding ones.

Meetverb

To make physical or perceptual contact.

Passverb

To fail to pay (a dividend).

Meetverb

To converge and finally touch or intersect.

The two streets meet at a crossroad half a mile away.

Passverb

To go beyond; surpass

The inheritance passed my wildest dreams.

Meetverb

To touch or hit something while moving.

The right wing of the car met the column in the garage, leaving a dent.

Passverb

To undergo (a trial or examination) with favorable results

She passed every test.

Meetverb

To adjoin, be physically touching.

The carpet meets the wall at this side of the room.The forest meets the sea along this part of the coast.

Passverb

To cause or allow to go through a trial, test, or examination successfully

The instructor passed all the candidates.

Meetverb

To satisfy; to comply with.

This proposal meets my requirements.The company agrees to meet the cost of any repairs.

Passverb

To cause to move

We passed our hands over the fabric.

Meetverb

To perceive; to come to a knowledge of; to have personal acquaintance with; to experience; to suffer.

The eye met a horrid sight.He met his fate.

Passverb

To cause to move into a certain position

pass a ribbon around a package.

Meetnoun

A sports competition, especially for track and field or swimming (a swim meet).

Passverb

To cause to move as part of a process

pass liquid through a filter.

Meetnoun

A gathering of riders, horses and hounds for foxhunting; a field meet for hunting.

Passverb

To cause to go by

The sergeant passed his troops before the grandstand.

Meetnoun

(rail transport) A meeting of two trains in opposite directions on a single track, when one is put into a siding to let the other cross.

Passverb

To allow to cross a barrier

The border guard passed the tourists.

Meetnoun

A meeting.

OK, let's arrange a meet with Tyler and ask him.

Passverb

(Baseball) To walk (a batter).

Meetnoun

(algebra) The greatest lower bound, an operation between pairs of elements in a lattice, denoted by the symbol ∧.

Passverb

To maneuver (the bull) by means of a pase in bullfighting.

Meetnoun

(Irish) An act of French kissing someone.

Passverb

To cause to be transferred from one to another; circulate

They passed the news quickly.

Meetadjective

(archaic) Suitable; right; proper.

Passverb

To hand over to someone else

Please pass the bread.

Meetnoun

a meeting at which a number of athletic contests are held

Passverb

(Sports) To transfer (a ball, for example) to a teammate, as by throwing.

Meetverb

come together;

I'll probably see you at the meetingHow nice to see you again!

Passverb

To cause to be accepted; circulate fraudulently

pass counterfeit money.

Meetverb

get together socially or for a specific purpose

Passverb

(Law) To convey (property) to an heir or heirs

to pass an estate.

Meetverb

be adjacent or come together;

The lines converge at this point

Passverb

(Medicine) To discharge (a waste product, for example) from a bodily part.

Meetverb

fill or meet a want or need

Passverb

(Medicine) To introduce (an instrument) into a bodily cavity.

Meetverb

satisfy a condition or restriction;

Does this paper meet the requirements for the degree?

Passverb

To approve; adopt

The legislature passed the bill.

Meetverb

satisfy or fulfill;

meet a needthis job doesn't match my dreams

Passverb

To be sanctioned, ratified, or approved by

The bill passed the House of Representatives.

Meetverb

get to know; get acquainted with;

I met this really handsome guy at a bar last night!we met in Singapore

Passverb

To pronounce; utter

pass judgment.pass sentence on an offender.

Meetverb

collect in one place;

We assembled in the church basementLet's gather in the dining room

Passnoun

The act of passing; passage.

Meetverb

meet by design; be present at the arrival of;

Can you meet me at the train station?

Passnoun

A way, such as a narrow gap between mountains, that affords passage around, over, or through a barrier.

Meetverb

contend against an opponent in a sport, game, or battle;

Princeton plays Yale this weekendCharlie likes to play Mary

Passnoun

A permit, ticket, or authorization to come and go at will.

Meetverb

experience as a reaction;

My proposal met with much opposition

Passnoun

A free ticket entitling one to transportation or admission.

Meetverb

undergo or suffer;

meet a violent deathsuffer a terrible fate

Passnoun

Written leave of absence from military duty.

Meetverb

be in direct physical contact with; make contact;

The two buildings touchTheir hands touchedThe wire must not contact the metal coverThe surfaces contact at this point

Passnoun

A passing grade, especially when graded using a pass-fail grading system.

Meetadjective

being precisely fitting and right;

it is only meet that she should be seated first

Passnoun

A sweep or run, as by an aircraft, over or toward an area or target.

Passnoun

A single complete cycle of operations, as by a machine or computer program.

Passnoun

A condition or situation, often critical in nature; a predicament

contract negotiations that had come to an emotional pass.

Passnoun

A sexual invitation or overture

Was he making a pass at her?.

Passnoun

A motion of the hand or the waving of a wand

The magician made a pass over the hat.

Passnoun

(Sports) A transfer of a ball or puck between teammates.

Passnoun

(Sports) A lunge or thrust in fencing.

Passnoun

(Baseball) A base on balls.

Passnoun

Sports & Games A refusal to bid, draw, bet, compete, or play.

Passnoun

(Games) A winning throw of the dice in craps.

Passnoun

A pase in bullfighting.

Passverb

To change place.

Passverb

(intransitive) To move or be moved from one place to another.

They passed from room to room.

Passverb

(transitive) To go past, by, over, or through; to proceed from one side to the other of; to move past.

You will pass a house on your right.

Passverb

(ditransitive) To cause to move or go; to send; to transfer from one person, place, or condition to another; to transmit; to deliver; to hand; to make over.

The waiter passed biscuits and cheese.John passed Suzie a note.The torch was passed from hand to hand.

Passverb

To eliminate (something) from the body by natural processes.

He was passing blood in both his urine and his stool.The poison had been passed by the time of the autopsy.

Passverb

To take a turn with (a line, gasket, etc.), as around a sail in furling, and make secure.

Passverb

(sport) To kick (the ball) with precision rather than at full force.

Passverb

(intransitive) To go from one person to another.

Passverb

(transitive) To put in circulation; to give currency to.

pass counterfeit money

Passverb

To cause to obtain entrance, admission, or conveyance.

pass a person into a theater or over a railroad

Passverb

To change in state or status

Passverb

(intransitive) To progress from one state to another; to advance.

He passed from youth into old age.

Passverb

(intransitive) To depart, to cease, to come to an end.

At first, she was worried, but that feeling soon passed.

Passverb

(intransitive) To die.

His grandmother passed yesterday.

Passverb

To achieve a successful outcome from.

He passed his examination.He attempted the examination, but did not expect to pass.

Passverb

To advance through all the steps or stages necessary to become valid or effective; to obtain the formal sanction of (a legislative body).

Despite the efforts of the opposition, the bill passed.The bill passed both houses of Congress.The bill passed the Senate, but did not pass in the House.

Passverb

To be conveyed or transferred by will, deed, or other instrument of conveyance.

The estate passes by the third clause in Mr Smith's deed to his son.When the old king passed away with only a daughter as an heir, the throne passed to a woman for the first time in centuries.

Passverb

(transitive) To cause to advance by stages of progress; to carry on with success through an ordeal, examination, or action; specifically, to give legal or official sanction to; to ratify; to enact; to approve as valid and just.

He passed the bill through the committee.

Passverb

To make a judgment on or upon a person or case.

Passverb

(transitive) To utter; to pronounce; to pledge.

Passverb

(intransitive) To change from one state to another (without the implication of progression).

Passverb

To move through time.

Passverb

To elapse, to be spent.

Their vacation passed pleasantly.

Passverb

To spend.

What will we do to pass the time?

Passverb

(transitive) To go by without noticing; to omit attention to; to take no note of; to disregard.

Passverb

(intransitive) To continue.

Passverb

(intransitive) To proceed without hindrance or opposition.

You're late, but I'll let it pass.

Passverb

(transitive) To live through; to have experience of; to undergo; to suffer.

She loved me for the dangers I had passed.

Passverb

(intransitive) To happen.

It will soon come to pass.

Passverb

To be accepted.

Passverb

(intransitive) To be tolerated as a substitute for something else, to "do".

It isn't ideal, but it will pass.

Passverb

(sociology) To be accepted by others as a member of a race, sex or other group to which they would not otherwise regard one as belonging (or belonging fully, without qualifier); especially to live and be known as white although one has black ancestry, or to live and be known as female although one was assigned male or vice versa.

Passverb

(intransitive) In any game, to decline to play in one's turn.

Passverb

(intransitive) In euchre, to decline to make the trump.

Passverb

To do or be better.

Passverb

To go beyond bounds; to surpass; to be in excess.

Passverb

(transitive) To transcend; to surpass; to excel; to exceed.

Passverb

To take heed.

Passnoun

An opening, road, or track, available for passing; especially, one through or over some dangerous or otherwise impracticable barrier such as a mountain range; a passageway; a defile; a ford.

a mountain pass

Passnoun

A channel connecting a river or body of water to the sea, for example at the mouth (delta) of a river.

the passes of the Mississippi

Passnoun

A single movement, especially of a hand, at, over, or along anything.

Passnoun

A single passage of a tool over something, or of something over a tool.

Passnoun

An attempt.

My pass at a career of writing proved unsuccessful.

Passnoun

Success in an examination or similar test.

I gained three passes at A-level, in mathematics, French, and English literature.

Passnoun

(fencing) A thrust or push; an attempt to stab or strike an adversary.

Passnoun

(figuratively) A thrust; a sally of wit.

Passnoun

A sexual advance.

The man kicked his friend out of the house after he made a pass at his wife.

Passnoun

(sports) The act of moving the ball or puck from one player to another.

Passnoun

(rail transport) A passing of two trains in the same direction on a single track, when one is put into a siding to let the other overtake it.

Passnoun

Permission or license to pass, or to go and come.

Passnoun

A document granting permission to pass or to go and come; a passport; a ticket permitting free transit or admission

a railroad pass; a theater pass; a military pass

Passnoun

(baseball) An intentional walk.

Smith was given a pass after Jones' double.

Passnoun

The state of things; condition; predicament; impasse.

Passnoun

(obsolete) Estimation; character.

Passnoun

A part, a division. Compare passus.

Passnoun

(cookery) The area in a restaurant kitchen where the finished dishes are passed from the chefs to the waiting staff.

Passnoun

An act of declining to play one's turn in a game, often by saying the word "pass".

A pass would have seen her win the game, but instead she gave a wrong answer and lost a point, putting her in second place.

Passnoun

(computing) A run through a document as part of a translation, compilation or reformatting process.

Most Pascal compilers process source code in a single pass.

Passnoun

A password (especially one for a restricted-access website).

Anyone want to trade passes?

Passnoun

(baseball) an advance to first base by a batter who receives four balls;

he worked the pitcher for a base on balls

Passnoun

(military) a written leave of absence;

he had a pass for three days

Passnoun

(American football) a play that involves one player throwing the ball to a teammate;

the coach sent in a passing play on third and long

Passnoun

the location in a range of mountains of a geological formation that is lower than the surrounding peaks;

we got through the pass before it started to snow

Passnoun

any authorization to pass or go somewhere;

the pass to visit had a strict time limit

Passnoun

a document indicating permission to do something without restrictions;

the media representatives had special passes

Passnoun

a flight or run by an aircraft over a target;

the plane turned to make a second pass

Passnoun

a bad or difficult situation or state of affairs

Passnoun

a difficult juncture;

a pretty passmatters came to a head yesterday

Passnoun

one complete cycle of operations (as by a computer);

it was not possible to complete the computation in a single pass

Passnoun

you advance to the next round in a tournament without playing an opponent;

he had a bye in the first round

Passnoun

a permit to enter or leave a military installation;

he had to show his pass in order to get out

Passnoun

a complementary (free) ticket;

the start got passes for his family

Passnoun

a usually brief attempt;

he took a crack at itI gave it a whirl

Passnoun

(sports) the act of throwing the ball to another member of your team;

the pass was fumbled

Passnoun

success in satisfying a test or requirement;

his future depended on his passing that testhe got a pass in introductory chemistry

Passverb

go across or through;

We passed the point where the police car had parkedA terrible thought went through his mind

Passverb

pass by;

A black limousine passed by when she looked out the windowHe passed his professor in the hallOne line of soldiers surpassed the other

Passverb

make laws, bills, etc. or bring into effect by legislation;

They passed the amendmentWe cannot legislate how people's spend their free time

Passverb

pass by;

three years elapsed

Passverb

place into the hands or custody of;

hand me the spoon, pleaseTurn the files over to me, pleaseHe turned over the prisoner to his lawyers

Passverb

stretch out over a distance, space, time, or scope; run or extend between two points or beyond a certain point;

Service runs all the way to CranburyHis knowledge doesn't go very farMy memory extends back to my fourth year of lifeThe facts extend beyond a consideration of her personal assets

Passverb

travel past;

The sports car passed all the trucks

Passverb

come to pass;

What is happening?The meeting took place off without an incidenceNothing occurred that seemed important

Passverb

go unchallenged; be approved;

The bill cleared the House

Passverb

pass (time) in a specific way;

How are you spending your summer vacation?

Passverb

guide or pass over something;

He ran his eyes over her bodyShe ran her fingers along the carved figurineHe drew her hair through his fingers

Passverb

transmit information ;

Please communicate this message to all employees

Passverb

disappear gradually;

The pain eventually passed off

Passverb

go successfully through a test or a selection process;

She passed the new Jersey Bar Exam and can practice law now

Passverb

go beyond;

She exceeded our expectationsShe topped her performance of last year

Passverb

accept or judge as acceptable;

The teacher passed the student although he was weak

Passverb

allow to go without comment or censure;

the insult passed as if unnoticed

Passverb

transfer to another; of rights or property;

Our house passed under his official control

Passverb

pass into a specified state or condition;

He sank into Nirvana

Passverb

be identified, regarded, accepted, or mistaken for someone or something else; as by denying one's own ancestry or background;

He could pass as his twin brotherShe passed as a White woman even though her grandfather was Black

Passverb

throw (a ball) to another player;

Smith passed

Passverb

be inherited by;

The estate fell to my sisterThe land returned to the familyThe estate devolved to an heir that everybody had assumed to be dead

Passverb

cause to pass;

She passed around the plates

Passverb

grant authorization or clearance for;

Clear the manuscript for publicationThe rock star never authorized this slanderous biography

Passverb

pass from physical life and lose all all bodily attributes and functions necessary to sustain life;

She died from cancerThey children perished in the fireThe patient went peacefully

Passverb

eliminate from the body;

Pass a kidney stone

Passadjective

of advancing the ball by throwing it;

a team with a good passing attacka pass play