March vs. Marsh

March vs. Marsh — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between March and Marsh

Marchverb

To walk steadily and rhythmically forward in step with others.

Marshnoun

An area of low-lying land that is usually saturated with water and is dominated by herbaceous rather than woody plants.

Marchverb

To begin to move in such a manner

The troops will march at dawn.

Marshnoun

an area of low, wet land, often with tall grass

Marchverb

To proceed directly and purposefully

marched in and demanded to see the manager.

Marshnoun

low-lying wet land with grassy vegetation; usually is a transition zone between land and water;

thousands of acres of marshlandthe fens of eastern England

Marchverb

To progress steadily onward; advance

Time marches on.

Marshnoun

United States painter (1898-1954)

Marchverb

To participate in an organized walk, as for a public cause.

Marshnoun

New Zealand writer of detective stories (1899-1982)

Marchverb

To cause to move or otherwise progress in a steady rhythmical manner

march soldiers into battle.marched us off to the dentist.

Marchverb

To traverse by progressing steadily and rhythmically

They marched the route in a day.

Marchverb

To have a common boundary

England marches with Scotland.

Marchnoun

The steady forward movement of a body of troops.

Marchnoun

A long tiring journey on foot.

Marchnoun

Steady forward movement or progression

the march of time.

Marchnoun

A regulated pace

quick march.slow march.

Marchnoun

The distance covered within a certain period of time by moving or progressing steadily and rhythmically

a week's march away.

Marchnoun

(Music) A composition in regularly accented, usually duple meter that is appropriate to accompany marching.

Marchnoun

An organized walk or procession by a group of people for a specific cause or issue.

Marchnoun

The border or boundary of a country or an area of land; a frontier.

Marchnoun

A tract of land bordering on two countries and claimed by both.

Marchnoun

The third month of the year in the Gregorian calendar. See Table at calendar.

Marchnoun

A formal, rhythmic way of walking, used especially by soldiers, bands and in ceremonies.

Marchnoun

A political rally or parade

Marchnoun

Any song in the genre of music written for marching (see Wikipedia's article on this type of music)

Marchnoun

Steady forward movement or progression.

the march of time

Marchnoun

(euchre) The feat of taking all the tricks of a hand.

Marchnoun

A border region, especially one originally set up to defend a boundary.

Marchnoun

(historical) A region at a frontier governed by a marquess.

Marchnoun

Any of various territories with similar meanings or etymologies in their native languages.

Marchnoun

(obsolete) Smallage.

Marchverb

(intransitive) To walk with long, regular strides, as a soldier does.

Marchverb

(transitive) To cause someone to walk somewhere.

Marchverb

To go to war; to make military advances.

Marchverb

(figurative) To make steady progress.

Marchverb

(intransitive) To have common borders or frontiers

Marchnoun

the month following February and preceding April

Marchnoun

the act of marching; walking with regular steps (especially in a procession of some kind);

it was a long marchwe heard the sound of marching

Marchnoun

a steady advance;

the march of sciencethe march of time

Marchnoun

a procession of people walking together;

the march went up Fifth Avenue

Marchnoun

district consisting of the area on either side of a border or boundary of a country or an area;

the Welsh marches between England and Wales

Marchnoun

genre of music written for marching;

Sousa wrote the best marches

Marchnoun

a degree granted for the successful completion of advanced study of architecture

Marchverb

march in a procession;

They processed into the dining room

Marchverb

force to march;

The Japanese marched their prisoners through Manchuria

Marchverb

walk fast, with regular or measured steps; walk with a stride;

He marched into the classroom and announced the examThe soldiers marched across the border

Marchverb

march in protest; take part in a demonstration;

Thousands demonstrated against globalization during the meeting of the most powerful economic nations in Seattle

Marchverb

walk ostentatiously;

She parades her new husband around town

Marchverb

cause to march or go at a marching pace;

They marched the mules into the desert

Marchverb

lie adjacent to another or share a boundary;

Canada adjoins the U.S.England marches with Scotland