Leech vs. Leach

Leech vs. Leach — Is There a Difference?
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Difference Between Leech and Leach

Leechnoun

Any of various chiefly aquatic carnivorous or bloodsucking annelid worms of the class (or subclass) Hirudinea, of which one species (Hirudo medicinalis) was formerly widely used by physicians for therapeutic bloodletting.

Leachverb

To remove soluble or other constituents from by the action of a percolating liquid

heavy rains that leached the soil of minerals.

Leechnoun

One that preys on or clings to another; a parasite.

Leachverb

To remove from a substance by the action of a percolating liquid

acids in groundwater that leach calcium out of the bedrock.

Leechnoun

(Archaic) A physician.

Leachverb

To empty; drain

"a world leached of pleasure, voided of meaning" (Marilynne Robinson).
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Leechnoun

Either vertical edge of a square sail.

Leachverb

To be dissolved or passed out by a percolating liquid.

Leechnoun

The after edge of a fore-and-aft sail.

Leachnoun

The act or process of leaching.

Leechverb

To bleed with leeches.

Leachnoun

A porous, perforated, or sievelike vessel that holds material to be leached.

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Leechverb

To drain the essence or exhaust the resources of.

Leachnoun

The substance through which a liquid is leached.

Leechverb

To attach oneself to another in the manner of a leech.

Leachnoun

A quantity of wood ashes, through which water passes, and thus imbibes the alkali.

Leechnoun

An aquatic blood-sucking annelid of class Hirudinea, especially Hirudo medicinalis.

Leachnoun

A tub or vat for leaching ashes, bark, etc.

Leechnoun

(figuratively) A person who derives profit from others in a parasitic fashion.

Leachnoun

(nautical) lang=en.

Leechnoun

A glass tube designed for drawing blood from damaged tissue by means of a vacuum.

Leachnoun

A jelly-like sweetmeat popular in the fifteenth century.

Leechnoun

(archaic) A physician.

Leachverb

(transitive) To purge a soluble matter out of something by the action of a percolating fluid.

Heavy rainfall can leach out minerals important for plant growth from the soil.

Leechnoun

A healer.

Leachverb

(intransitive) To part with soluble constituents by percolation.

Leechnoun

(nautical) The vertical edge of a square sail.

Leachnoun

the process of leaching

Leechnoun

(nautical) The aft edge of a triangular sail.

Leachverb

cause (a liquid) to leach or percolate

Leechverb

(transitive) To apply a leech medicinally, so that it sucks blood from the patient.

Leachverb

permeate or penetrate gradually;

the fertilizer leached into the ground

Leechverb

(transitive) To drain (resources) without giving back.

Bert leeched hundreds of files from the BBS, but never uploaded anything in return.

Leachverb

remove substances from by a percolating liquid;

leach the soil

Leechverb

To treat, cure or heal.

Leechnoun

carnivorous or bloodsucking aquatic or terrestrial worms typically having a sucker at each end

Leechnoun

a follower who hangs around a host (without benefit to the host) in hope of gain or advantage

Leechverb

draw blood;

In the old days, doctors routinely bled patients as part of the treatment