Leap vs. Spring

Leap vs. Spring — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between Leap and Spring

Leapverb

To propel oneself quickly upward or a long way; spring or jump

The goat leaped over the wall. The salmon leapt across the barrier.

Springverb

To move upward or forward in a single quick motion or a series of such motions; leap

The goat sprang over the log.

Leapverb

To move quickly or suddenly

leaped out of his chair to answer the door.

Springverb

To move suddenly, especially because of being resilient or moved by a spring

I let the branch spring forward. The door sprang shut.

Leapverb

To change quickly or abruptly from one condition or subject to another

always leaping to conclusions.

Springverb

To start doing something suddenly

The firefighters sprang into action.

Leapverb

To act quickly or impulsively

leaped at the opportunity to travel.

Springverb

To appear or come into being quickly

New businesses are springing up rapidly.

Leapverb

To enter eagerly into an activity; plunge

leapt into the project with both feet.

Springverb

To issue or emerge suddenly

A cry sprang from her lips. A thought springs to mind.

Leapverb

To propel oneself over

I couldn't leap the brook.

Springverb

To arise from a source; develop

Their frustration springs from a misunderstanding.

Leapverb

To cause to leap

She leapt her horse over the hurdle.

Springverb

To jump or leap.

He sprang up from his seat.

Leapnoun

The act of leaping; a jump.

Springverb

To pass over by leaping.

Leapnoun

A place jumped over or from.

Springverb

To produce or disclose unexpectedly, especially of surprises, traps, etc.

Leapnoun

The distance cleared in a leap.

Springverb

(slang) To release or set free, especially from prison.

Leapnoun

An abrupt or precipitous passage, shift, or transition

a leap from rags to riches.

Springverb

To suddenly catch someone doing something illegal or against the rules.

Leapverb

(intransitive) To jump.

Springverb

To come into being, often quickly or sharply.

Trees are already springing up in the plantation.

Leapverb

(transitive) To pass over by a leap or jump.

to leap a wall or a ditch

Springverb

To start or rise suddenly, as from a covert.

Leapverb

(transitive) To copulate with (a female beast); to cover.

Springverb

To cause to spring up; to start or rouse, as game; to cause to rise from the earth, or from a covert.

to spring a pheasant

Leapverb

(transitive) To cause to leap.

to leap a horse across a ditch

Springverb

(nautical) To crack or split; to bend or strain so as to weaken.

to spring a mast or a yard

Leapnoun

The act of leaping or jumping.

Springverb

To bend by force, as something stiff or strong; to force or put by bending, as a beam into its sockets, and allowing it to straighten when in place; often with in, out, etc.

to spring in a slat or a bar

Leapnoun

The distance traversed by a leap or jump.

Springverb

To issue with speed and violence; to move with activity; to dart; to shoot.

Leapnoun

A group of leopards.

Springverb

To move suddenly when pressure is released.

A bow, when bent, springs back by its elastic power.

Leapnoun

(figuratively) A significant move forward.

Springverb

(intransitive) To bend from a straight direction or plane surface; to become warped.

A piece of timber, or a plank, sometimes springs in seasoning.

Leapnoun

(figuratively) A large step in reasoning, often one that is not justified by the facts.

It's quite a leap to claim that those cloud formations are evidence of UFOs.

Springverb

To shoot up, out, or forth; to come to the light; to begin to appear; to emerge, like a plant from its seed, a stream from its source, etc.; often followed by up, forth, or out.

Leapnoun

(mining) A fault.

Springverb

To issue or proceed, as from a parent or ancestor; to result, as from a cause, motive, reason, or principle.

Leapnoun

Copulation with, or coverture of, a female beast.

Springverb

(obsolete) To grow; to prosper.

Leapnoun

(music) A passing from one note to another by an interval, especially by a long one, or by one including several other intermediate intervals.

Springverb

To build (an arch).

They sprung an arch over the lintel.

Leapnoun

(calendar) Intercalary, bissextile.

Springverb

To sound (a rattle, such as a watchman's rattle).

Leapnoun

(obsolete) A basket.

Springnoun

A leap; a bound; a jump.

Leapnoun

A trap or snare for fish, made from twigs; a weely.

Springnoun

(countable) Traditionally the first of the four seasons of the year in temperate regions, in which plants spring from the ground and trees come into blossom, following winter and preceding summer.

Spring is the time of the year most species reproduce.I spent my spring holidays in Morocco.You can visit me in the spring, when the weather is bearable.

Leapnoun

Half a bushel.

Springnoun

(countable) Meteorologically, the months of March, April and May in the northern hemisphere or September, October and November in the southern.

Leapnoun

a light springing movement upwards or forwards

Springnoun

(countable) The astronomically delineated period from the moment of vernal equinox, approximately March 21 in the northern hemisphere to the moment of the summer solstice, approximately June 21. (See Spring (season) for other variations.)

Leapnoun

an abrupt transition;

a successful leap from college to the major leagues

Springnoun

(countable) Spring tide; a tide of greater-than-average range, that is, around the first or third quarter of a lunar month, or around the times of the new or full moon.

Leapnoun

a sudden and decisive increase;

a jump in attendance

Springnoun

(countable) A place where water or oil emerges from the ground.

This water is bottled from the spring of the river.

Leapnoun

the distance leaped (or to be leaped);

a leap of 10 feet

Springnoun

(uncountable) The property of a body of springing to its original form after being compressed, stretched, etc.

the spring of a bow

Leapverb

move forward by leaps and bounds;

The horse bounded across the meadowThe child leapt across the puddleCan you jump over the fence?

Springnoun

Elastic power or force.

Leapverb

pass abruptly from one state or topic to another;

leap into famejump to a conclusion

Springnoun

(countable) A mechanical device made of flexible or coiled material that exerts force when it is bent, compressed or stretched.

We jumped so hard the bed springs broke.

Leapverb

cause to jump or leap;

the trainer jumped the tiger through the hoop

Springnoun

An erection of the penis.

Springnoun

(countable) The source of an action or of a supply.

Springnoun

Any active power; that by which action, or motion, is produced or propagated; cause; origin; motive.

Springnoun

That which springs, or is originated, from a source.

Springnoun

A race; lineage.

Springnoun

A youth; a springald.

Springnoun

A shoot; a plant; a young tree; also, a grove of trees; woodland.

Springnoun

(obsolete) That which causes one to spring; specifically, a lively tune.

Springnoun

The time of growth and progress; early portion; first stage.

Springnoun

A rope attaching the bow of a vessel to the stern-side of the jetty, or vice versa, to stop the vessel from surging.

You should put a couple of springs onto the jetty to stop the boat moving so much.

Springnoun

(nautical) A line led from a vessel's quarter to her cable so that by tightening or slacking it she can be made to lie in any desired position; a line led diagonally from the bow or stern of a vessel to some point upon the wharf to which she is moored.

Springnoun

(nautical) A crack or fissure in a mast or yard, running obliquely or transversely.

Springnoun

the season of growth;

the emerging buds were a sure sign of springhe will hold office until the spring of next year

Springnoun

a natural flow of ground water

Springnoun

a metal elastic device that returns to its shape or position when pushed or pulled or pressed;

the spring was broken

Springnoun

a light springing movement upwards or forwards

Springnoun

the elasticity of something that can be stretched and returns to its original length

Springnoun

a point at which water issues forth

Springverb

move forward by leaps and bounds;

The horse bounded across the meadowThe child leapt across the puddleCan you jump over the fence?

Springverb

develop into a distinctive entity;

our plans began to take shape

Springverb

spring back; spring away from an impact;

The rubber ball bouncedThese particles do not resile but they unite after they collide

Springverb

produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly;

He sprang a new haircut on his wife

Springverb

develop suddenly;

The tire sprang a leak

Springverb

produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly;

He sprang these news on me just as I was leaving