Hop vs. Leap

Hop vs. Leap — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between Hop and Leap

Hopverb

To move with light bounding skips or leaps.

Leapverb

To propel oneself quickly upward or a long way; spring or jump

The goat leaped over the wall. The salmon leapt across the barrier.

Hopverb

(Informal) To move quickly or be busily active

The shipping department is hopping this week.

Leapverb

To move quickly or suddenly

leaped out of his chair to answer the door.

Hopverb

To jump on one foot or with both feet at the same time.

Leapverb

To change quickly or abruptly from one condition or subject to another

always leaping to conclusions.

Hopverb

To make a quick trip, especially in an airplane.

Leapverb

To act quickly or impulsively

leaped at the opportunity to travel.

Hopverb

To travel or move often from place to place. Often used in combination

party-hop.

Leapverb

To enter eagerly into an activity; plunge

leapt into the project with both feet.

Hopverb

To move over by hopping

hop a ditch two feet wide.

Leapverb

To propel oneself over

I couldn't leap the brook.

Hopverb

(Informal) To get on (a train) surreptitiously in order to ride without paying a fare

hop a freight train.

Leapverb

To cause to leap

She leapt her horse over the hurdle.

Hopverb

To flavor with hops.

Leapnoun

The act of leaping; a jump.

Hopnoun

A light springy jump or leap, especially on one foot or with both feet at the same time.

Leapnoun

A place jumped over or from.

Hopnoun

A rebound

The ball took a bad hop.

Leapnoun

The distance cleared in a leap.

Hopnoun

(Informal) A dance or dance party.

Leapnoun

An abrupt or precipitous passage, shift, or transition

a leap from rags to riches.

Hopnoun

A short distance.

Leapverb

(intransitive) To jump.

Hopnoun

A short trip, especially by air.

Leapverb

(transitive) To pass over by a leap or jump.

to leap a wall or a ditch

Hopnoun

A free ride; a lift.

Leapverb

(transitive) To copulate with (a female beast); to cover.

Hopnoun

A twining vine (Humulus lupulus) having lobed leaves and green female flowers arranged in conelike spikes.

Leapverb

(transitive) To cause to leap.

to leap a horse across a ditch

Hopnoun

hops The dried female inflorescences of this plant, containing a bitter aromatic oil. They are used in brewing to inhibit bacterial growth and to add the characteristic bitter taste to beer.

Leapnoun

The act of leaping or jumping.

Hopnoun

(Slang) Opium.

Leapnoun

The distance traversed by a leap or jump.

Hopnoun

A short jump.

The frog crossed the brook in three or four hops.

Leapnoun

A group of leopards.

Hopnoun

A jump on one leg.

Leapnoun

(figuratively) A significant move forward.

Hopnoun

A short journey, especially in the case of air travel, one that take place on private plane.

Leapnoun

(figuratively) A large step in reasoning, often one that is not justified by the facts.

It's quite a leap to claim that those cloud formations are evidence of UFOs.

Hopnoun

A bounce, especially from the ground, of a thrown or batted ball.

Leapnoun

(mining) A fault.

Hopnoun

A dance.

Leapnoun

Copulation with, or coverture of, a female beast.

Hopnoun

(networking) The sending of a data packet from one host to another as part of its overall journey.

Leapnoun

(music) A passing from one note to another by an interval, especially by a long one, or by one including several other intermediate intervals.

Hopnoun

The plant (Humulus lupulus) from whose flowers, beer or ale is brewed.

Leapnoun

(calendar) Intercalary, bissextile.

Hopnoun

The flowers of the hop plant, dried and used to brew beer etc.

Leapnoun

(obsolete) A basket.

Hopnoun

Opium, or some other narcotic drug.

Leapnoun

A trap or snare for fish, made from twigs; a weely.

Hopnoun

The fruit of the dog rose; a hip.

Leapnoun

Half a bushel.

Hopverb

(intransitive) To jump a short distance.

Leapnoun

a light springing movement upwards or forwards

Hopverb

(intransitive) To jump on one foot.

Leapnoun

an abrupt transition;

a successful leap from college to the major leagues

Hopverb

(intransitive) To be in state of energetic activity.

Sorry, can't chat. Got to hop.The sudden rush of customers had everyone in the shop hopping.

Leapnoun

a sudden and decisive increase;

a jump in attendance

Hopverb

(transitive) To suddenly take a mode of transportation that one does not drive oneself, often surreptitiously.

I hopped a plane over here as soon as I heard the news.He was trying to hop a ride in an empty trailer headed north.He hopped a train to California.

Leapnoun

the distance leaped (or to be leaped);

a leap of 10 feet

Hopverb

(transitive) To jump onto, or over

Leapverb

move forward by leaps and bounds;

The horse bounded across the meadowThe child leapt across the puddleCan you jump over the fence?

Hopverb

To move frequently from one place or situation to another similar one.

We were party-hopping all weekend.We had to island hop on the weekly seaplane to get to his hideaway.

Leapverb

pass abruptly from one state or topic to another;

leap into famejump to a conclusion

Hopverb

(obsolete) To walk lame; to limp.

Leapverb

cause to jump or leap;

the trainer jumped the tiger through the hoop

Hopverb

To dance.

Hopverb

(transitive) To impregnate with hops, especially to add hops as a flavouring agent during the production of beer

Hopverb

(intransitive) To gather hops.

Hopnoun

the act of hopping; jumping upward or forward (especially on one foot)

Hopnoun

twining perennials having cordate leaves and flowers arranged in conelike spikes; the dried flowers of this plant are used in brewing to add the characteristic bitter taste to beer

Hopnoun

an informal dance where popular music is played

Hopverb

jump lightly

Hopverb

move quickly from one place to another

Hopverb

informal: travel by means of an aircraft, bus, etc.;

She hopped a train to ChicagoHe hopped rides all over the country

Hopverb

make a quick trip especially by air;

Hop the Pacific Ocean

Hopverb

jump across;

He hopped the bush

Hopverb

make a jump forward or upward