Gas vs. Wind

Gas vs. Wind — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between Gas and Wind

Gasnoun

The state of matter distinguished from the solid and liquid states by relatively low density and viscosity, relatively great expansion and contraction with changes in pressure and temperature, the ability to diffuse readily, and the spontaneous tendency to become distributed uniformly throughout any container.

Windnoun

Moving air, especially a natural and perceptible movement of air parallel to or along the ground.

Gasnoun

A substance in the gaseous state.

Windnoun

A movement of air generated artificially, as by bellows or a fan.

Gasnoun

Any of various mixtures of flammable gases used for lighting, heating, or cooking.

Windnoun

The direction from which a movement of air comes

The wind is north-northwest.

Gasnoun

Gasoline.

Windnoun

A movement of air coming from one of the four cardinal points of the compass

the four winds.

Gasnoun

The speed control of a gasoline engine. Used with the

Step on the gas.

Windnoun

Moving air carrying sound, an odor, or a scent.

Gasnoun

A gaseous asphyxiant, irritant, or poison.

Windnoun

Breath, especially normal or adequate breathing; respiration

had the wind knocked out of them.

Gasnoun

A gaseous anesthetic, such as nitrous oxide.

Windnoun

Gas produced in the stomach or intestines during digestion; flatulence.

Gasnoun

Flatulence.

Windnoun

The brass and woodwinds sections of a band or orchestra.

Gasnoun

Flatus.

Windnoun

Wind instruments or their players considered as a group.

Gasnoun

(Slang) Idle or boastful talk.

Windnoun

Woodwinds.

Gasnoun

(Slang) Someone or something exceptionally exciting or entertaining

The party was a gas.

Windnoun

Something that disrupts or destroys

the winds of war.

Gasverb

To treat chemically with gas.

Windnoun

A tendency; a trend

the winds of change.

Gasverb

To overcome, disable, or kill with poisonous fumes.

Windnoun

Information, especially of something concealed; intimation

Trouble will ensue if wind of this scandal gets out.

Gasverb

To give off gas.

Windnoun

Speech or writing empty of meaning; verbiage

His remarks on the subject are nothing but wind.

Gasverb

(Slang) To talk excessively.

Windnoun

Vain self-importance; pomposity

an expert who was full of wind even before becoming famous.

Gasnoun

Matter in a state intermediate between liquid and plasma that can be contained only if it is fully surrounded by a solid (or in a bubble of liquid) (or held together by gravitational pull); it can condense into a liquid, or can (rarely) become a solid directly.

A lot of gas had escaped from the cylinder.

Windnoun

The act of winding.

Gasnoun

A chemical element or compound in such a state.

The atmosphere is made up of a number of different gases.

Windnoun

A single turn, twist, or curve.

Gasnoun

(uncountable) A flammable gaseous hydrocarbon or hydrocarbon mixture (typically predominantly methane) used as a fuel, e.g. for cooking, heating, electricity generation or as a fuel in internal combustion engines in vehicles.

Gas-fired power stations have largely replaced coal-burning ones.

Windverb

To expose to free movement of air; ventilate or dry.

Gasnoun

(countable) A hob on a gas cooker.

She turned the gas on, put the potatoes on, then lit the oven.

Windverb

To detect the smell of; catch a scent of.

Gasnoun

(US) Methane or other waste gases trapped in one's belly as a result of the digestive process.

My tummy hurts so bad, I have gas.

Windverb

To pursue by following a scent.

Gasnoun

(slang) A humorous or entertaining event or person.

He is such a gas!

Windverb

To cause to be out of or short of breath.

Gasnoun

(baseball) A fastball.

The closer threw him nothing but gas.

Windverb

To afford a recovery of breath

stopped to wind and water the horses.

Gasnoun

Arterial or venous blood gas.

Windverb

To wrap (something) around a center or another object once or repeatedly

wind string around a spool.

Gasnoun

Gasoline; a derivative of petroleum used as fuel.

Windverb

To wrap or encircle (an object) in a series of coils; entwine

wound her injured leg with a bandage.wound the waist of the gown with lace and ribbons.

Gasnoun

(US) Gas pedal.

Windverb

To go along (a curving or twisting course)

wind a path through the mountains.

Gasverb

(transitive) To kill with poisonous gas.

Windverb

To proceed on (one's way) with a curving or twisting course.

Gasverb

(intransitive) To talk, chat.

Windverb

To introduce in a disguised or devious manner; insinuate

He wound a plea for money into his letter.

Gasverb

(intransitive) To emit gas.

The battery cell was gassing.

Windverb

To turn (a crank, for example) in a series of circular motions.

Gasverb

(transitive) To impregnate with gas.

to gas lime with chlorine in the manufacture of bleaching powder

Windverb

To coil the spring of (a mechanism) by turning a stem or cord, for example

wind a watch.

Gasverb

(transitive) To singe, as in a gas flame, so as to remove loose fibers.

to gas thread

Windverb

To coil (thread, for example), as onto a spool or into a ball.

Gasverb

(US) To give a vehicle more fuel in order to accelerate it.

The cops are coming. Gas it!

Windverb

To remove or unwind (thread, for example), as from a spool

wound the line off the reel.

Gasverb

(US) To fill (a vehicle's fuel tank) with fuel.

Windverb

To lift or haul by means of a windlass or winch

Wind the pail to the top of the well.

Gasadjective

comical, zany; fun, amusing

Mary's new boyfriend is a gas man.It was gas when the bird flew into the classroom.

Windverb

To move in or have a curving or twisting course

a river winding through a valley.

Gasnoun

the state of matter distinguished from the solid and liquid states by: relatively low density and viscosity; relatively great expansion and contraction with changes in pressure and temperature; the ability to diffuse readily; and the spontaneous tendency to become distributed uniformly throughout any container

Windverb

To move in or have a spiral or circular course

a column of smoke winding into the sky.

Gasnoun

a fluid in the gaseous state having neither independent shape nor volume and being able to expand indefinitely

Windverb

To be coiled or spiraled

The vine wound about the trellis.

Gasnoun

a volatile flammable mixture of hydrocarbons (hexane and heptane and octane etc.) derived from petroleum; used mainly as a fuel in internal-combustion engines

Windverb

To be twisted or whorled into curved forms.

Gasnoun

a state of excessive gas in the alimentary canal

Windverb

To proceed misleadingly or insidiously in discourse or conduct.

Gasnoun

a pedal that controls the throttle valve;

he stepped on the gas

Windverb

To become wound

a clock that winds with difficulty.

Gasnoun

a fossil fuel in the gaseous state; used for cooking and heating homes

Windverb

To blow (a wind instrument).

Gasverb

attack with gas; subject to gas fumes;

The despot gassed the rebellious tribes

Windverb

To sound by blowing.

Gasverb

show off

Windnoun

Real or perceived movement of atmospheric air usually caused by convection or differences in air pressure.

The wind blew through her hair as she stood on the deck of the ship.As they accelerated onto the motorway, the wind tore the plywood off the car's roof-rack.The winds in Chicago are fierce.

Windnoun

Air artificially put in motion by any force or action.

the wind of a cannon ball;the wind of a bellows

Windnoun

The ability to breathe easily.

After the second lap he was already out of wind.The fall knocked the wind out of him.

Windnoun

News of an event, especially by hearsay or gossip. (Used with catch, often in the past tense.)

Steve caught wind of Martha's dalliance with his best friend.

Windnoun

One of the five basic elements (see Wikipedia article on the Classical elements).

Windnoun

Flatus.

Eww. Someone just passed wind.

Windnoun

Breath modulated by the respiratory and vocal organs, or by an instrument.

Windnoun

(music) The woodwind section of an orchestra. Occasionally also used to include the brass section.

Windnoun

A direction from which the wind may blow; a point of the compass; especially, one of the cardinal points, which are often called the "four winds".

Windnoun

Types of playing-tile in the game of mah-jongg, named after the four winds.

Windnoun

A disease of sheep, in which the intestines are distended with air, or rather affected with a violent inflammation. It occurs immediately after shearing.

Windnoun

Mere breath or talk; empty effort; idle words.

Windnoun

A bird, the dotterel.

Windnoun

The region of the solar plexus, where a blow may paralyze the diaphragm and cause temporary loss of breath or other injury.

Windnoun

The act of winding or turning; a turn; a bend; a twist.

Windverb

(transitive) To blow air through a wind instrument or horn to make a sound.

Windverb

(transitive) To cause (someone) to become breathless, often by a blow to the abdomen.

The boxer was winded during round two.

Windverb

(reflexive) To exhaust oneself to the point of being short of breath.

I can’t run another step — I’m winded.

Windverb

(British) To turn a boat or ship around, so that the wind strikes it on the opposite side.

Windverb

(transitive) To expose to the wind; to winnow; to ventilate.

Windverb

(transitive) To perceive or follow by scent.

The hounds winded the game.

Windverb

(transitive) To rest (a horse, etc.) in order to allow the breath to be recovered; to breathe.

Windverb

(transitive) To turn a windmill so that its sails face into the wind.

Windverb

(transitive) To turn coils of (a cord or something similar) around something.

to wind thread on a spool or into a ball

Windverb

(transitive) To tighten the spring of a clockwork mechanism such as that of a clock.

Please wind that old-fashioned alarm clock.

Windverb

To entwist; to enfold; to encircle.

Windverb

(ergative) To travel, or to cause something to travel, in a way that is not straight.

Vines wind round a pole.The river winds through the plain.

Windverb

To have complete control over; to turn and bend at one's pleasure; to vary or alter or will; to regulate; to govern.

Windverb

To introduce by insinuation; to insinuate.

Windverb

To cover or surround with something coiled about.

to wind a rope with twine

Windverb

To make a winding motion.

Windnoun

air moving (sometimes with considerable force) from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure;

trees bent under the fierce windswhen there is no wind, rowthe radioactivity was being swept upwards by the air current and out into the atmosphere

Windnoun

a tendency or force that influences events;

the winds of change

Windnoun

breath;

the collision knocked the wind out of him

Windnoun

empty rhetoric or insincere or exaggerated talk;

that's a lot of winddon't give me any of that jazz

Windnoun

an indication of potential opportunity;

he got a tip on the stock marketa good lead for a job

Windnoun

a musical instrument in which the sound is produced by an enclosed column of air that is moved by the breath

Windnoun

a reflex that expels intestinal gas through the anus

Windnoun

the act of winding or twisting;

he put the key in the old clock and gave it a good wind

Windverb

to move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular course;

the river winds through the hillsthe path meanders through the vineyardssometimes, the gout wanders through the entire body

Windverb

extend in curves and turns;

The road winds around the lake

Windverb

wrap or coil around;

roll your hair around your fingerTwine the thread around the spool

Windverb

catch the scent of; get wind of;

The dog nosed out the drugs

Windverb

coil the spring of (some mechanical device) by turning a stem;

wind your watch

Windverb

form into a wreath

Windverb

raise or haul up with or as if with mechanical help;

hoist the bicycle onto the roof of the car