Foster vs. Nurture

Foster vs. Nurture — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between Foster and Nurture

Fosterverb

To bring up; nurture

bear and foster offspring.

Nurturenoun

The action of raising or caring for offspring

the nurture of an infant.

Fosterverb

To promote the growth and development of; cultivate

detect and foster artistic talent.

Nurturenoun

(Biology) The sum of environmental influences and conditions acting on an organism, especially in contrast to heredity.

Fosterverb

To nurse; cherish

foster a secret hope.

Nurturenoun

The fostering or overseeing of the development of something

the nurture of an idea.

Fosteradjective

Providing parental care and nurture to children not related through legal or blood ties

foster parents.foster grandparents.a foster home.

Nurturenoun

Something that nourishes; sustenance

"The butterfly poked its tiny proboscis down into her hair, probing for nurture" (Barbara Kingsolver).

Fosteradjective

Receiving parental care and nurture from those not related to one through legal or blood ties

foster children.

Nurtureverb

To raise or educate (a child, for example).

Fosteradjective

Providing parental care to children not related to oneself.

foster parents

Nurtureverb

To encourage or help develop; cultivate

"a small college town that had nurtured his intellectual and creative pursuits" (James S. Hirsch).

Fosteradjective

Receiving such care.

a foster child

Nurtureverb

To provide sustenance for; nourish

the meadow that nurtures the cattle.

Fosteradjective

Related by such care.

We are a foster family.

Nurturenoun

The act of nourishing or nursing; tender care

Fosternoun

A foster parent.

Some fosters end up adopting.

Nurturenoun

That which nourishes; food; diet.

Fosternoun

(uncountable) The care given to another; guardianship.

Nurturenoun

The environmental influences that contribute to the development of an individual (as opposed to "nature").

Fosterverb

(transitive) To nurture or bring up offspring, or to provide similar parental care to an unrelated child.

Nurtureverb

To nourish or nurse.

Fosterverb

(transitive) To cultivate and grow something.

Our company fosters an appreciation for the arts.

Nurtureverb

To encourage, especially the growth or development of something.

Fosterverb

(transitive) To nurse or cherish something.

Nurturenoun

the properties acquired as a consequence of the way you were treated as a child

Fosterverb

To be nurtured or trained up together.

Nurturenoun

raising someone to be an accepted member of the community;

they debated whether nature or nurture was more important

Fosternoun

United States songwriter whose songs embody the sentiment of the South before the American Civil War (1826-1864)

Nurtureverb

help develop, help grow;

nurture his talents

Fosterverb

promote the growth of;

Foster our children's well-being and education

Nurtureverb

bring up;

raise a familybring up children

Fosterverb

bring up under fosterage; of children

Nurtureverb

provide with nourishment;

We sustained ourselves on bread and waterThis kind of food is not nourishing for young children

Fosterverb

help develop, help grow;

nurture his talents

Fosteradjective

providing or receiving nurture or parental care though not related by blood or legal ties;

foster parentfoster childfoster homesurrogate father