Flock vs. Herd

Flock vs. Herd — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between Flock and Herd

Flocknoun

A group of animals that live, travel, or feed together.

Herdnoun

A group of cattle or other large herbivorous mammals of a single kind kept together for a specific purpose.

Flocknoun

A group of people under the leadership of one person, especially the members of a church.

Herdnoun

A number of wild animals of one species, especially large herbivorous mammals, that remain together as a group

a herd of elephants.

Flocknoun

A large crowd or number

a flock of visitors.a flock of questions.

Herdnoun

A large number of people; a crowd

a herd of stranded passengers.

Flockverb

To stuff with waste wool or cotton.

Herdnoun

The multitude of common people regarded as a mass

"It is the luxurious and dissipated who set the fashions which the herd so diligently follow" (Henry David Thoreau).

Flockverb

To texture or pattern with pulverized wool or felt.

Herdverb

To come together in a herd

The sheep herded for warmth.

Flocknoun

A large number of birds, especially those gathered together for the purpose of migration.

Herdverb

To gather, keep, or drive (animals) in a herd.

Flocknoun

A large number of animals, especially sheep or goats kept together.

Herdverb

To tend (sheep or cattle).

Flocknoun

Those served by a particular pastor or shepherd.

Herdverb

To gather and place into a group or mass

herded the children into the auditorium.

Flocknoun

A large number of people.

Herdnoun

A number of domestic animals assembled together under the watch or ownership of a keeper.

Flocknoun

Coarse tufts of wool or cotton used in bedding

Herdnoun

Any collection of animals gathered or travelling in a company.

Flocknoun

A lock of wool or hair.

Herdnoun

A crowd, a mass of people; now usually pejorative: a rabble.

Flocknoun

Very fine sifted woollen refuse, especially that from shearing the nap of cloths, formerly used as a coating for wallpaper to give it a velvety or clothlike appearance; also, the dust of vegetable fibre used for a similar purpose.

Herdnoun

Someone who keeps a group of domestic animals; a herdsman.

Flockverb

(intransitive) To congregate in or head towards a place in large numbers.

People flocked to the cinema to see the new film.

Herdverb

(intransitive) To unite or associate in a herd; to feed or run together, or in company.

Sheep herd on many hills.

Flockverb

To flock to; to crowd.

Herdverb

(transitive) To unite or associate in a herd

He is employed to herd the goats.

Flockverb

To treat a pool with chemicals to remove suspended particles.

Herdverb

(intransitive) To associate; to ally oneself with, or place oneself among, a group or company.

Flockverb

(transitive) To coat a surface with dense fibers or particles.

Herdverb

To act as a herdsman or a shepherd.

Flocknoun

a church congregation guided by a pastor

Herdverb

(transitive) To form or put into a herd.

I heard the herd of cattle being herded home from a long way away.

Flocknoun

a group of birds

Herdnoun

a group of cattle or sheep or other domestic mammals all of the same kind that are herded by humans

Flocknoun

(often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extent;

a batch of lettersa deal of troublea lot of moneyhe made a mint on the stock marketit must have cost plenty

Herdnoun

a group of wild animals of one species that remain together: antelope or elephants or seals or whales or zebra

Flocknoun

an orderly crowd;

a troop of children

Herdnoun

a crowd especially of ordinary or undistinguished persons or things;

his brilliance raised him above the ruckthe children resembled a fairy herd

Flocknoun

a group of sheep or goats

Herdverb

cause to herd, drive, or crowd together;

We herded the children into a spare classroom

Flockverb

move as a crowd or in a group;

Tourists flocked to the shrine where the statue was said to have shed tears

Herdverb

move together, like a herd

Flockverb

come together as in a cluster or flock;

The poets constellate in this town every summer

Herdverb

keep, move, or drive animals;

Who will be herding the cattle when the cowboy dies?