Fell vs. Mountain

Fell vs. Mountain — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between Fell and Mountain

Fellverb

To cause to fall by striking; cut or knock down

fell a tree.fell an opponent in boxing.

Mountainnoun

Abbr. Mt. or Mtn. A natural elevation of the earth's surface having considerable mass, generally steep sides, and a height greater than that of a hill.

Fellverb

To kill

was felled by an assassin's bullet.

Mountainnoun

A large heap

a mountain of laundry.

Fellverb

To sew or finish (a seam) with the raw edges flattened, turned under, and stitched down.

Mountainnoun

A huge quantity

a mountain of trouble.

Fellverb

Past tense of fall.

Mountainnoun

A large mass of earth and rock, rising above the common level of the earth or adjacent land, usually given by geographers as above 1000 feet in height (or 304.8 metres), though such masses may still be described as hills in comparison with larger mountains.

Everest is the highest mountain in the world.We spent the weekend hiking in the mountains.

Fellnoun

The timber cut down in one season.

Mountainnoun

A large amount.

There's still a mountain of work to do.

Fellnoun

A felled seam.

Mountainnoun

A very large person or thing.

He was a real mountain of a man, standing seven feet tall.

Fellnoun

The hide of an animal; a pelt.

Mountainnoun

(figuratively) A difficult task or challenge.

Fellnoun

A thin membrane directly beneath the hide.

Mountainnoun

(slang) A woman's large breast.

Fellnoun

Chiefly British An upland stretch of open country; a moor.

Mountainnoun

(cartomancy) The twenty-first Lenormand card.

Fellnoun

A barren or stony hill.

Mountainnoun

a land mass that projects well above its surroundings; higher than a hill

Felladjective

Of an inhumanly cruel nature; fierce

fell hordes.

Mountainnoun

a large number or amount;

made lots of new friendsshe amassed a mountain of newspapers

Felladjective

Capable of destroying; lethal

a fell blow.

Mountainadjective

relating to or located in mountains;

mountain people

Felladjective

Dire; sinister

by some fell chance.

Felladjective

(Scots) Sharp and biting.

Fellverb

(transitive) To make something fall; especially to chop down a tree.

Fellverb

(transitive) To strike down, kill, destroy.

Fellverb

(sewing) To stitch down a protruding flap of fabric, as a seam allowance, or pleat.

Fellnoun

A cutting-down of timber.

Fellnoun

The stitching down of a fold of cloth; specifically, the portion of a kilt, from the waist to the seat, where the pleats are stitched down.

Fellnoun

(textiles) The end of a web, formed by the last thread of the weft.

Fellnoun

An animal skin, hide, pelt.

Fellnoun

Human skin (now only as a metaphorical use of previous sense).

Fellnoun

A rocky ridge or chain of mountains.

Fellnoun

A wild field or upland moor.

Fellnoun

Gall; anger; melancholy.

Felladjective

Of a strong and cruel nature; eagre and unsparing; grim; fierce; ruthless; savage.

one fell swoop

Felladjective

Strong and fiery; biting; keen; sharp; pungent

Felladjective

Very large; huge.

Felladjective

(obsolete) Eager; earnest; intent.

Felladverb

Sharply; fiercely.

Fellnoun

the dressed skin of an animal (especially a large animal)

Fellnoun

seam made by turning under or folding together and stitching the seamed materials to avoid rough edges

Fellnoun

the act of felling something (as a tree)

Fellverb

cause to fall by or as if by delivering a blow;

strike down a treeLightning struck down the hikers

Fellverb

pass away rapidly;

Time flies like an arrowTime fleeing beneath him

Fellverb

sew a seam by folding the edges

Felladjective

(of persons or their actions) able or disposed to inflict pain or suffering;

a barbarous crimebrutal beatingscruel torturesStalin's roughshod treatment of the kulaksa savage slapvicious kicks