Execute vs. Start

Execute vs. Start — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between Execute and Start

Executeverb

To put into effect; carry out

a government that executes the decisions of the ruling party.

Startverb

To begin a movement, activity, or undertaking

She started to dance. The dog started barking. Once we start in, we'll get a feel for the project.

Executeverb

To perform; do

execute a U-turn.

Startverb

To move on the initial part of a journey

They started for the summit.

Executeverb

To create (a work of art, for example) in accordance with a prescribed design.

Startverb

To have a beginning; commence

The movie starts at nine.

Executeverb

To make valid, as by signing

execute a deed.

Startverb

To come quickly into view, life, or activity; spring forth

The boy's tears started when the balloon popped.

Executeverb

To perform or carry out what is required by

execute the terms of a will.

Startverb

To have as an initial part or job

I started as an assistant.

Executeverb

To put to death, especially by carrying out a lawful sentence.

Startverb

To move one's body or a part of it suddenly or involuntarily

started at the loud noise.

Executeverb

(Computers) To run (a program or instruction).

Startverb

(Sports) To be in the initial lineup of a game or race.

Executeverb

(transitive) To kill as punishment for capital crimes.

There are certain states where it is lawful to execute prisoners convicted of certain crimes.

Startverb

To protrude or bulge

eyes that fairly started from their sockets in fear.

Executeverb

(transitive) To carry out; to put into effect.

Your orders have been executed, sir!I'll execute your orders as soon as this meeting is adjourned.

Startverb

To become loosened or disengaged.

Executeverb

(transitive) To perform.

to execute a difficult piece of music brilliantlyto execute a turn in ballet

Startverb

To take the first step in doing

We start work at dawn.

Executeverb

(transitive) To cause to become legally valid

to execute a contract

Startverb

To cause to come into being; make happen or originate

Bad wiring started the fire. The website started the rumor.

Executeverb

To start, launch or run

to execute a program

Startverb

To set into motion, operation, or activity

start an engine.a shot that started the race.

Executeverb

To run, usually successfully.

The program executed, but data problems were discovered.

Startverb

To begin to attend

start school.

Executeverb

kill as a means of socially sanctioned punishment;

In some states, criminals are executed

Startverb

To cause (someone) to have an initial position or role

The manager started him in marketing.

Executeverb

murder execution-style;

The Mafioso who collaborated with the police was executed

Startverb

To play in the initial lineup of (a game).

Executeverb

put in effect;

carry out a taskexecute the decision of the peopleHe actioned the operation

Startverb

To put (a player) into the initial lineup of a game.

Executeverb

carry out the legalities of;

execute a will or a deed

Startverb

To enter (a participant) into a race or game.

Executeverb

carry out a process or program, as on a computer or a machine;

Run the dishwasherrun a new program on the Macthe computer executed the instruction

Startverb

To found; establish

start a business.

Executeverb

carry out or perform an action;

John did the painting, the weeding, and he cleaned out the guttersthe skater executed a triple pirouetteshe did a little dance

Startverb

To tend in an early stage of development

start seedlings.

Executeverb

sign in the presence of witnesses;

The President executed the treaty

Startverb

To rouse (game) from its hiding place or lair; flush.

Startverb

To cause to become displaced or loosened.

Startnoun

An act of beginning; an initial effort

I made a start on keeping a journal.

Startnoun

The beginning of a new construction project

an application for a building start.

Startnoun

A result of an initial effort

What we did may not sound like much, but it's a start.

Startnoun

A place or time of beginning

at the start of the decade.

Startnoun

A starting line for a race.

Startnoun

A signal to begin a race.

Startnoun

An instance of beginning a race

a sprinter who improved her start.

Startnoun

An instance of being in the starting lineup for a game, especially as a pitcher

In five starts, he has three wins.

Startnoun

A startled reaction or movement.

Startnoun

A part that has become dislocated or loosened.

Startnoun

A position of advantage over others, as in a race or an endeavor; a lead

Our rivals have a three-month start in research.

Startnoun

An opportunity granted to pursue a career or course of action.

Startnoun

The beginning of an activity.

The movie was entertaining from start to finish.

Startnoun

A sudden involuntary movement.

He woke with a start.

Startnoun

The beginning point of a race, a board game, etc.

Captured pieces are returned to the start of the board.

Startnoun

An appearance in a sports game from the beginning of the match.

Jones has been a substitute before, but made his first start for the team last Sunday.

Startnoun

(horticulture) A young plant germinated in a pot to be transplanted later.

Startnoun

An initial advantage over somebody else; a head start.

to get, or have, the start

Startverb

(transitive) To begin, commence, initiate.

Startverb

To set in motion.

to start a stream of water;to start a rumour;to start a business

Startverb

To begin.

Startverb

To initiate operation of a vehicle or machine.

to start the engine

Startverb

To put or raise (a question, an objection); to put forward (a subject for discussion).

Startverb

To bring onto being or into view; to originate; to invent.

Startverb

(intransitive) To begin an activity.

The rain started at 9:00.

Startverb

(intransitive) To have its origin (at), begin.

The speed limit is 50 km/h, starting at the edge of town.The blue line starts one foot away from the wall.

Startverb

To startle or be startled; to move or be moved suddenly.

Startverb

(intransitive) To jerk suddenly in surprise.

Startverb

(intransitive) To awaken suddenly.

Startverb

(transitive) To disturb and cause to move suddenly; to startle; to alarm; to rouse; to cause to flee or fly.

The hounds started a fox.

Startverb

(transitive) To move suddenly from its place or position; to displace or loosen; to dislocate.

to start a bone;the storm started the bolts in the vessel

Startverb

(intransitive) To break away, to come loose.

Startverb

To put into play.

Startverb

To pour out; to empty; to tap and begin drawing from.

to start a water cask

Startverb

To start one's periods (menstruation).

Have you started yet?

Startnoun

the beginning of anything;

it was off to a good start

Startnoun

the time at which something is supposed to begin;

they got an early startshe knew from the get-go that he was the man for her

Startnoun

a turn to be a starter (in a game at the beginning);

he got his start because one of the regular pitchers was in the hospitalhis starting meant that the coach thought he was one of their best linemen

Startnoun

a sudden involuntary movement;

he awoke with a start

Startnoun

the act of starting something;

he was responsible for the beginning of negotiations

Startnoun

a line indicating the location of the start of a race or a game

Startnoun

a signal to begin (as in a race);

the starting signal was a green lightthe runners awaited the start

Startnoun

advantage gained by an early start as in a race;

with an hour's start he will be hard to catch

Startverb

take the first step or steps in carrying out an action;

We began working at dawnWho will start?Get working as soon as the sun rises!The first tourists began to arrive in CambodiaHe began early in the dayLet's get down to work now

Startverb

set in motion, cause to start;

The U.S. started a war in the Middle EastThe Iraqis began hostilitiesbegin a new chapter in your life

Startverb

leave;

The family took off for Florida

Startverb

have a beginning, in a temporal, spatial, or evaluative sense;

The DMZ begins right over the hillThe second movement begins after the AllegroPrices for these homes start at $250,000

Startverb

bring into being;

He initiated a new programStart a foundation

Startverb

get off the ground;

Who started this company?We embarked on an exciting enterpriseI start my day with a good breakfastWe began the new semesterThe afternoon session begins at 4 PMThe blood shed started when the partisans launched a surprise attack

Startverb

move or jump suddenly, as if in surprise or alarm;

She startled when I walked into the room

Startverb

get going or set in motion;

We simply could not start the enginestart up the computer

Startverb

begin or set in motion;

I start at eight in the morningReady, set, go!

Startverb

begin work or acting in a certain capacity, office or job;

Take up a positionstart a new job

Startverb

play in the starting line-up

Startverb

have a beginning characterized in some specified way;

The novel begins with a murderMy property begins with the three maple treesHer day begins with a work-outThe semester begins with a convocation ceremony

Startverb

begin an event that is implied and limited by the nature or inherent function of the direct object;

begin a cigarShe started the soup while it was still hotWe started physics in 10th grade