Dumpster vs. Skip

Dumpster vs. Skip — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between Dumpster and Skip

Dumpsternoun

A container for receiving, transporting, and dumping waste materials.

Skipverb

To move by hopping on one foot and then the other.

Dumpsternoun

A large, usually metal trash receptacle designed to be hoisted up by a garbage truck in order to be emptied.

Skipverb

To leap lightly about.

Dumpsternoun

a container designed to receive and transport and dump waste

Skipverb

To bounce over or be deflected from a surface; skim or ricochet

threw the stone so it skipped over the water.

Skipverb

To pass from point to point, omitting or disregarding what intervenes

skipped through the list hurriedly.skipping over the dull passages in the novel.

Skipverb

To be promoted in school beyond the next regular class or grade.

Skipverb

(Informal) To leave hastily; abscond

skipped out of town.

Skipverb

To misfire. Used of an engine.

Skipverb

To leap or jump lightly over

skip rope.

Skipverb

To pass over without mentioning; omit

skipped the minor details of the story.

Skipverb

To miss or omit as one in a series

My heart skipped a beat.

Skipverb

To cause to bounce lightly over a surface; skim.

Skipverb

To be promoted beyond (the next grade or level).

Skipverb

(Informal) To leave hastily

The fugitive skipped town.

Skipverb

(Informal) To fail to attend

We skipped science class again.

Skipnoun

A leaping or jumping movement, especially a gait in which hops and steps alternate.

Skipnoun

An act of passing over something; an omission.

Skipnoun

A control mechanism on an audio or video player that interrupts the playing of a recording and advances or reverses to the beginning of the nearest chapter, track, or other division.

Skipnoun

A container for receiving, transporting, and dumping waste materials.

Skipverb

(intransitive) To move by hopping on alternate feet.

She will skip from one end of the sidewalk to the other.

Skipverb

(intransitive) To leap about lightly.

Skipverb

(intransitive) To skim, ricochet or bounce over a surface.

The rock will skip across the pond.

Skipverb

(transitive) To throw (something), making it skim, ricochet, or bounce over a surface.

I bet I can skip this rock to the other side of the pond.

Skipverb

(transitive) To disregard, miss or omit part of a continuation (some item or stage).

My heart will skip a beat.I will read most of the book, but skip the first chapter because the video covered it.

Skipverb

To place an item in a skip.

Skipverb

Not to attend (some event, especially a class or a meeting).

Yeah, I really should go to the quarterly meeting but I think I'm going to skip it.

Skipverb

To leave

to skip the country

Skipverb

To leap lightly over.

to skip the rope

Skipverb

To jump rope.

The girls were skipping in the playground.

Skipnoun

A leaping, jumping or skipping movement.

Skipnoun

The act of passing over an interval from one thing to another; an omission of a part.

Skipnoun

(music) A passage from one sound to another by more than a degree at once.

Skipnoun

A person who attempts to disappear so as not to be found.

Skipnoun

(radio) skywave propagation

Skipnoun

a gait in which steps and hops alternate

Skipnoun

a mistake resulting from neglect

Skipverb

bypass;

He skipped a row in the text and so the sentence was incomprehensible

Skipverb

intentionally fail to attend;

cut class

Skipverb

jump lightly

Skipverb

leave suddenly;

She persuaded him to decampskip town

Skipverb

bound off one point after another

Skipverb

cause to skip over a surface;

Skip a stone across the pond