Difference Between
versus

Compleat vs. Complete: Decoding the Right Spelling

Shumaila Saeed
By Shumaila Saeed || Updated on December 29, 2023
"Compleat is an archaic spelling, while Complete is the correct modern form, meaning fully finished or whole."
Compleat vs. Complete

Which is correct: Compleat or Complete

How to spell Complete?

Compleat is Incorrect

Complete is Correct

How to remember correct spelling of Complete?

Visualize "Complete" as "Comp-lete," linking it to 'elite' for its excellence in being whole.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023
Recall that "Complete" and "Compete" both share the 'ete' ending, but with different meanings.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023
Remember, "Complete" has the same ending as "Obsolete," both ending in 'ete'.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023
Think of "Complete" as combining 'com' (together) and 'plete' (full), forming a complete whole.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023
Associate "Complete" with "Completely," focusing on the 'ete' ending.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023

Complete Definitions

To make whole or perfect.
The final chapter completes the narrative of the book.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023
Having all necessary or normal parts, components, or steps; entire
A complete medical history.
A complete set of dishes.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
(Botany) Having all principal parts, namely, the sepals, petals, stamens, and pistil or pistils. Used of a flower.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
Having come to an end; concluded
The renovation of the kitchen is complete.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
Absolute; thorough
Complete control.
A complete mystery.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
Accomplished; consummate
A complete musician.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
(Football) Caught in bounds by a receiver
A complete pass.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
To bring to a finish or an end
She has completed her studies.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
To make whole, with all necessary elements or parts
A second child would complete their family. Fill in the blanks to complete the form.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
(Football) To throw (a forward pass) that is caught in bounds by a receiver.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
(ambitransitive) To finish; to make done; to reach the end.
He completed the assignment on time.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
(transitive) To make whole or entire.
The last chapter completes the book nicely.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
(poker) To call from the small blind in an unraised pot.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
With all parts included; with nothing missing; full.
My life will be complete once I buy this new television.
She offered me complete control of the project.
After she found the rook, the chess set was complete.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
Finished; ended; concluded; completed.
When your homework is complete, you can go and play with Martin.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
Generic intensifier.
He is a complete bastard!
It was a complete shock when he turned up on my doorstep.
Our vacation was a complete disaster.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
In which every Cauchy sequence converges to a point within the space.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
In which every set with a lower bound has a greatest lower bound.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
In which all small limits exist.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
In which every semantically valid well-formed formula is provable.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
That is in a given complexity class and is such that every other problem in the class can be reduced to it (usually in polynomial time or logarithmic space).
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
Filled up; with no part or element lacking; free from deficiency; entire; perfect; consummate.
Ye are complete in him.
That thou, dead corse, again in complete steelRevisit'st thus the glimpses of the moon.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
Finished; ended; concluded; completed; as, the edifice is complete.
This course of vanity almost complete.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
Having all the parts or organs which belong to it or to the typical form; having calyx, corolla, stamens, and pistil.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
To bring to a state in which there is no deficiency; to perfect; to consummate; to accomplish; to fulfill; to finish; as, to complete a task, or a poem; to complete a course of education.
Bred only and completed to the tasteOf lustful appetence.
And, to complete her bliss, a fool for mate.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
Come or bring to a finish or an end;
He finished the dishes
She completed the requirements for her Master's Degree
The fastest runner finished the race in just over 2 hours; others finished in over 4 hours
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
Bring to a whole, with all the necessary parts or elements;
A child would complete the family
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
Complete or carry out;
Discharge one's duties
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
Complete a pass
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
Write all the required information onto a form;
Fill out this questionnaire, please!
Make out a form
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
Having every necessary or normal part or component or step;
A complete meal
A complete wardrobe
A complete set pf the Britannica
A complete set of china
A complete defeat
A complete accounting
An incomplete flower
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
Perfect and complete in every respect; having all necessary qualities;
A complete gentleman
Consummate happiness
A consummate performance
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
Having all four whorls or principal parts--sepals and petals and stamens and carpels (or pistils);
Complete flowers
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
Highly skilled;
An accomplished pianist
A complete musician
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
Without qualification; used informally as (often pejorative) intensifiers;
An arrant fool
A complete coward
A consummate fool
A double-dyed villain
Gross negligence
A perfect idiot
Pure folly
What a sodding mess
Stark staring mad
A thoroughgoing villain
Utter nonsense
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
Having come or been brought to a conclusion;
The harvesting was complete
The affair is over, ended, finished
The abruptly terminated interview
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Oct 19, 2023
Having all necessary parts, elements, or steps.
The puzzle was finally complete after hours of work.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023
Thoroughly done or executed.
She gave a complete analysis of the report.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023
Total; absolute.
His victory in the chess match was a complete surprise.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023
To finish making or doing.
He completed his degree in architecture last year.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023

Repeatedly Asked Queries

What is the difference between "Compleat" and "Complete"?

"Compleat" is an archaic form of "Complete," which is the modern, correct spelling used to indicate something fully finished or whole.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023

How do you pronounce "Complete"?

"Complete" is pronounced as /kəmˈpliːt/, with emphasis on the second syllable.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023

Are there synonyms for "Complete" in English?

Yes, words like 'entire,' 'total,' and 'finished' can be synonyms for "Complete."
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023

Can "Complete" be used in different contexts?

Absolutely, "Complete" is versatile and can describe everything from tasks to emotional states.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023

How is "Complete" used in a sentence?

"Complete" can be used as "She will complete the project next week" or "The collection is now complete."
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023

Can "Complete" be used as both a verb and an adjective?

Yes, "Complete" functions as both, meaning to finish something (verb) or describing something as whole or finished (adjective).
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023

What is the noun form of "Complete"?

The noun form is "completion," referring to the act of completing or the state of being complete.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023

What is the origin of "Complete"?

"Complete" comes from Latin "completus," past participle of "complere," meaning 'fill up, finish, fulfill.'
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023

Can "Complete" imply perfection?

In some contexts, "Complete" might imply a state of perfection or thoroughness.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023

Does "Complete" change form when pluralized?

As an adjective, "Complete" remains the same; as a verb, it changes form based on tense and subject.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023

Is "Compleat" still used in modern English?

"Compleat" is rarely used, mostly seen in historical texts or as a stylistic choice to evoke an old-fashioned tone.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023

Does "Complete" have different meanings in different fields?

Yes, in various fields like mathematics or law, "Complete" can have specific technical meanings.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023

Is "Complete" a common word in English?

Yes, "Complete" is a commonly used word in both spoken and written English.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023

Can "Complete" be used in formal writing?

Yes, "Complete" is suitable for both formal and informal contexts.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023

Are there idiomatic expressions using "Complete"?

Yes, phrases like "a complete turnaround" or "complete overhaul" are common.
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed
Dec 29, 2023

Share this page

Link for your blog / website
HTML
Link to share via messenger
About Author
Shumaila Saeed
Written by
Shumaila Saeed
Shumaila Saeed, an expert content creator with 6 years of experience, specializes in distilling complex topics into easily digestible comparisons, shining a light on the nuances that both inform and educate readers with clarity and accuracy.

Popular Misspellings

Trending Misspellings

Invester vs. InvestorInvester vs. Investor
Shumaila SaeedShumaila Saeed
February 23, 2024
"Invester" is an incorrect spelling, while "Investor," meaning a person who allocates capital with the expectation of a future financial return, is correct.
Verticle vs. VerticalVerticle vs. Vertical
Shumaila SaeedShumaila Saeed
January 29, 2024
"Verticle" is incorrect spelling, while "Vertical" is correct, referring to something that stands upright or at right angles to the ground, like a skyscraper.
Sailer vs. SailorSailer vs. Sailor
Shumaila SaeedShumaila Saeed
December 25, 2023
"Sailer is incorrect spelling while Sailor is correct, denoting a person who works or travels on a ship."
Sulphate vs. SulfateSulphate vs. Sulfate
Shumaila SaeedShumaila Saeed
December 26, 2023
Sulphate is incorrect spelling, while Sulfate is correct; it refers to a salt or ester of sulfuric acid.
Commited vs. CommittedCommited vs. Committed
Shumaila SaeedShumaila Saeed
December 29, 2023
Commited is incorrect spelling while Committed, meaning fully dedicated or pledged to a cause or activity, is correct.
Frolick vs. FrolicFrolick vs. Frolic
Shumaila SaeedShumaila Saeed
December 29, 2023
"Frolick" is incorrect spelling, while "Frolic" is correct, meaning to play and move about cheerfully, energetically, or lively.
Amung vs. AmongAmung vs. Among
Dua FatimaDua Fatima
March 1, 2024
Amung is incorrect spelling while among is correct, signifying being included or involved in a group.
Intelegent vs. IntelligentIntelegent vs. Intelligent
Dua FatimaDua Fatima
June 19, 2024
Intelegent is incorrect spelling while intelligent is correct, denoting someone who has or shows a high mental capacity quickly and clearly.
Hidding vs. HidingHidding vs. Hiding
Shumaila SaeedShumaila Saeed
March 15, 2024
The incorrect word "Hidding" is a misspelling of the word "Hiding," which means concealing oneself from view or avoiding being seen.
Stold vs. StolenStold vs. Stolen
Shumaila SaeedShumaila Saeed
March 6, 2024
"Stold" is incorrect, whereas "Stolen" is the correct past participle of "steal."
Roomate vs. RoommateRoomate vs. Roommate
Shumaila SaeedShumaila Saeed
January 22, 2024
Roomate is incorrect spelling while Roommate is correct, meaning a person with whom one shares a room or living accommodation.
Persue vs. PursuePersue vs. Pursue
Shumaila SaeedShumaila Saeed
January 27, 2024
"Persue" is incorrect spelling, while "Pursue," meaning to follow or strive for something persistently or to chase, is correct.
Excist vs. ExistExcist vs. Exist
Shumaila SaeedShumaila Saeed
December 26, 2023
"Excist is an incorrect spelling, while Exist is correct; to exist means to have actual being or to live."
Analise vs. AnalyzeAnalise vs. Analyze
Shumaila SaeedShumaila Saeed
December 28, 2023
"Analise is incorrect spelling while Analyze is correct, referring to examining something methodically to explain and interpret it."
Toung vs. TongueToung vs. Tongue
Shumaila SaeedShumaila Saeed
January 14, 2024
"Toung is incorrect spelling while Tongue is correct, the latter referring to the muscular organ in the mouth used for tasting, swallowing, and speech."
Heigth vs. HeightHeigth vs. Height
Shumaila SaeedShumaila Saeed
December 27, 2023
"Heigth is incorrect spelling while Height is correct, denoting the measurement from base to top or head to foot in a standing position."
Woop vs. WhoopWoop vs. Whoop
Shumaila SaeedShumaila Saeed
December 25, 2023
"Woop is incorrect spelling while Whoop is correct, meaning a loud, excited, or exuberant shout, often expressing joy, enthusiasm, or triumph."
Withdrawl vs. WithdrawalWithdrawl vs. Withdrawal
Shumaila SaeedShumaila Saeed
December 26, 2023
Withdrawl is incorrect spelling while Withdrawal is correct, referring to the act of taking something back or retreating.
Unhonest vs. DishonestUnhonest vs. Dishonest
Shumaila SaeedShumaila Saeed
December 27, 2023
"Unhonest" is an incorrect spelling, while "Dishonest" is correct, meaning not honest, truthful, or sincere; characterized by deceit or a lack of integrity in actions or statements.
Tryed vs. TriedTryed vs. Tried
Shumaila SaeedShumaila Saeed
December 31, 2023
"Tryed" is incorrect spelling, while "Tried" is correct, meaning to attempt or make an effort to do something.
Laied vs. LaidLaied vs. Laid
Dua FatimaDua Fatima
March 6, 2024
Laied is incorrect spelling while laid is correct, denoting the past tense and past participle of the verb "lay".
Concious vs. ConsciousConcious vs. Conscious
Dua FatimaDua Fatima
March 21, 2024
Concious is incorrect spelling while conscious is correct, referring to being aware of one's surroundings or thoughts.
Unforseen vs. UnforeseenUnforseen vs. Unforeseen
Dua FatimaDua Fatima
March 31, 2024
Unforseen is incorrect spelling while unforeseen is correct, meaning not anticipated or predicted.
Supress vs. SuppressSupress vs. Suppress
Dua FatimaDua Fatima
March 1, 2024
Supress is incorrect spelling while suppress is correct, meaning to end or stop something by force.

New Misspellings