Along vs. Long

Along vs. Long — Is There a Difference?
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Difference Between Along and Long

Alongpreposition

Over the length of

walked along the path.

Longadjective

Extending or traveling a relatively great distance.

Alongpreposition

On a line or course parallel and close to; continuously beside

rowed along the shore.the trees along the avenue.

Longadjective

Having relatively great height; tall.

Alongpreposition

In accordance with

The committee split along party lines over the issue.

Longadjective

Having the greater length of two or the greatest length of several

the long edge of the door.
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Alongadverb

Forward; onward

We drove along, admiring the view. Farther along, we passed a hitchhiker.

Longadjective

Of relatively great duration

a long time.

Alongadverb

As company

Bring your friend along.

Longadjective

Of a specified linear extent or duration

a mile long.an hour long.

Alongadverb

In accompaniment or association; together

packed an atlas along with other books. See Usage Note at together.

Longadjective

Made up of many members or items

a long shopping list.
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Alongadverb

With one; at hand

Luckily, I had my camera along. Our guests should be along soon.

Longadjective

Extending beyond an average or standard

a long game.

Alongadverb

(Informal) Advanced to some degree

My father is getting along in years.

Longadjective

Extending or landing beyond a given boundary, limit, or goal

Her first serve was long.

Alongpreposition

By the length of; in a line with the length of; lengthwise next to.

Longadjective

Tediously protracted; lengthy

a long speech.

Alongpreposition

In a line with, with a progressive motion on; onward on; forward on.

Longadjective

Concerned with distant issues; far-reaching

took a long view of the geopolitical issues.

Alongadverb

In company; together.

John played the piano and everyone sang along.

Longadjective

Involving substantial chance; risky

long odds.

Alongadverb

Onward, forward, with progressive action.

Don't stop here. Just move along.

Longadjective

Having an abundance or excess of

"politicians whose résumés are long on competence" (Margaret Garrard Warner).

Alongadverb

with a forward motion;

we drove along admiring the viewthe horse trotted along at a steady pacethe circus traveled on to the next citymove alongmarch on

Longadjective

Having a holding of a commodity or security in expectation of a rise in price

long on soybeans.

Alongadverb

in accompaniment or as a companion;

his little sister came along to the moviesI brought my camera alongworking along with his father

Longadjective

(Linguistics) Having a comparatively great duration. Used of a vowel or consonant.

Alongadverb

to a more advanced state;

the work is moving alongwell along in their researchhurrying their education alonggetting along in years

Longadjective

(Grammar) Relating to or being the English speech sounds (ā, ē, ī, ō, ) that are tense vowels or diphthongs.

Alongadverb

in addition (usually followed by `with');

we sent them food and some clothing went along in the packagealong with the package came a billconsider the advantages along with the disadvantages

Longadjective

Being of relatively great duration. Used of a syllable in quantitative prosody.

Alongadverb

in line with a length or direction (often followed by `by' or `beside');

pass the word alongran along beside mecottages along by the river

Longadverb

During or for an extended period of time

The promotion was long due.

Longadverb

At or to a considerable distance; far

She walked long past the end of the trail.

Longadverb

Beyond a given boundary, limit, or goal

hit the return long.

Longadverb

For or throughout a specified period

They talked all night long.

Longadverb

At a point of time distant from that referred to

That event took place long before we were born.

Longadverb

Into or in a long position, as of a commodity market.

Longnoun

A long time

This won't take long.

Longnoun

(Linguistics) A long syllable, vowel, or consonant.

Longnoun

One who acquires holdings in a security or commodity in expectation of a rise in price.

Longnoun

A garment size for a tall person.

Longnoun

longs Trousers extending to the feet or ankles.

Longverb

To have an earnest, heartfelt desire, especially for something beyond reach.

Longadjective

Having much distance from one terminating point on an object or an area to another terminating point usually applies to horizontal dimensions; see Usage Notes below.

It's a long way from the Earth to the Moon.

Longadjective

Having great duration.

The pyramids of Egypt have been around for a long time.

Longadjective

Seemingly lasting a lot of time, because it is boring or tedious or tiring.

Longadjective

Not short; tall.

Longadjective

(finance) Possessing or owning stocks, bonds, commodities or other financial instruments with the aim of benefiting of the expected rise in their value.

I'm long in DuPont;I have a long position in DuPont.

Longadjective

(cricket) Of a fielding position, close to the boundary (or closer to the boundary than the equivalent short position).

Longadjective

That land beyond the baseline (and therefore is out).

No! That forehand is longnb....

Longadjective

Occurring or coming after an extended interval; distant in time; far away.

Longadjective

(archaic) On account of, because of.

Longadverb

Over a great distance in space.

He threw the ball long.

Longadverb

For a particular duration.

How long is it until the next bus arrives?

Longadverb

For a long duration.

Will this interview take long?Paris has long been considered one of the most cultured cities in the world.

Longnoun

(linguistics) A long vowel.

Longnoun

(programming) A long integer variable, twice the size of an int, two or four times the size of a short, and half of a long long.

A long is typically 64 bits in a 32-bit environment.

Longnoun

(finance) An entity with a long position in an asset.

Every uptick made the longs cheer.

Longnoun

(music) A note formerly used in music, one half the length of a large, twice that of a breve.

Longnoun

longitude

Longverb

To take a long position in.

Longverb

(intransitive) To await, aspire, desire greatly (something to occur or to be true)

She longed for him to come back.

Longverb

(archaic) To be appropriate to, to pertain or belong to.

Longnoun

a comparatively long time;

this won't take longthey haven't been gone long

Longverb

desire strongly or persistently

Longadjective

primarily temporal sense; being or indicating a relatively great or greater than average duration or passage of time or a duration as specified;

a long lifea long boring speecha long timea long friendshipa long gamelong agoan hour long

Longadjective

primarily spatial sense; of relatively great or greater than average spatial extension or extension as specified;

a long roada long distancecontained many long wordsten miles long

Longadjective

of relatively great height;

a race of long gaunt menlooked out the long French windows

Longadjective

holding securities or commodities in expectation of a rise in prices;

is long on coffeea long position in gold

Longadjective

of speech sounds (especially vowels) of relatively long duration (as e.g. the English vowel sounds in `bate', `beat', `bite', `boat', `boot')

Longadjective

used of syllables that are unaccented or of relatively long duration

Longadjective

involving substantial risk;

long odds

Longadjective

(of memory) having greater than average range;

a long memory especially for insultsa tenacious memory

Longadjective

planning prudently for the future;

large goals that required farsighted policiestook a long view of the geopolitical issues

Longadjective

having or being more than normal or necessary:

long on brainsin long supply

Longadverb

for an extended time or at a distant time;

a promotion long overduesomething long hoped forhis name has long been forgottentalked all night longhow long will you be gone?arrived long before he was expectedit is long after your bedtime

Longadverb

for an extended distance