Adjoin vs. Conjoin

Adjoin vs. Conjoin — Is There a Difference?

Difference Between Adjoin and Conjoin

Adjoinverb

To be next to; be contiguous to

property that adjoins ours.

Conjoinverb

To join or become joined together; unite.

Adjoinverb

To attach

"I do adjoin a copy of the letter that I have received" (John Fowles).

Conjoinverb

(transitive) To join together; to unite; to combine.

They are representatives that will loosely conjoin a nation.

Adjoinverb

To be contiguous.

Conjoinverb

(transitive) To marry.

I will conjoin you in holy matrimony.

Adjoinverb

(transitive) To be in contact or connection with.

The living room and dining room adjoin each other.

Conjoinverb

To join as coordinate elements, often with a coordinating conjunction, such as coordinate clauses.

Adjoinverb

To extend an algebraic object (e.g. a field, a ring, etc.) by adding to it (an element not belonging to it) and all finite power series of (the element).

\textbf{Q}\left(\sqrt{2}\right) can be obtained from \textbf{Q} by adjoining \sqrt{2} to \textbf{Q}.

Conjoinverb

To combine two sets, conditions, or expressions by a logical AND; to intersect.

Adjoinverb

lie adjacent to another or share a boundary;

Canada adjoins the U.S.England marches with Scotland

Conjoinverb

(intransitive) To unite, to join, to league.

Adjoinverb

be in direct physical contact with; make contact;

The two buildings touchTheir hands touchedThe wire must not contact the metal coverThe surfaces contact at this point

Conjoinverb

make contact or come together;

The two roads join here

Adjoinverb

attach or add;

I adjoin a copy of your my lawyer's letter

Conjoinverb

take in marriage